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Clare Midgley

Professor Clare Midgley

Research Professor in History

Summary

I came to Sheffield Hallam in 2006 as Research Professor in History. My first career was in Archaeology but I then switched to nineteenth-century British social history, gaining a PhD in History in 1989. My key research focus is on British women’s history as it intersects with the history of the British Empire, and my publications include Women Against Slavery, Gender and Imperialism and Feminism and Empire. I am a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and from 2010 to 2015 was President of the International Federation for Research in Women’s History.

  • About

    I came to Sheffield Hallam in 2006 as Research Professor in History. My first career was in Archaeology, and after gaining a degree from Edinburgh University I worked for a number of years for the Museum of London as a Field Archaeologist. Following a year in the US, I switched my research interests to nineteenth-century British social history, gaining am MA (with Distinction) in Social History from the University of Essex in 1985 and a PhD in History in 1989. Before coming to SHU I held academic positions at Staffordshire University and London Guildhall University, where I developed an MA in Women’s History in collaboration with the Women’s Library. My key research focus is on British women’s history as it intersects with the history of the British Empire, and my publications include Women Against Slavery, Gender and Imperialism and Feminism and Empire. I am currently completing a research project exploring links between Indian, British and American religious and social reformers in the age of empire. My teaching and postgraduate supervision is in the fields of imperial history, women’s history and modern British history. I am a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and from 2010 to 2015 was President of the International Federation for Research in Women’s History, organising the Federation’s conferences in Sheffield and in Jinan, China. I have also acted as Deputy Editor of Women’s History Review and co-editor of Gender and History. I have been in receipt of external research funding from the ESCR, the AHRC and the Leverhulme Trust.

    Britain in the ‘long’ nineteenth-century: women’s history, history of feminism, history of empire, transnational networks of religion and reform

  • Teaching

    Department of Humanities

    Social Sciences and Humanities

    History

    History

    Making Modern Britain; India and the British Raj

  • Research

    • Humanities Research Centre

    I am currently completing a research project on ‘Liberal Religion and the ‘Woman Question’ between East and West: collaboration between Indian, British and American reformers in the age of empire’. My co-edited book ‘Women in Transnational History: Connecting the Local and the Global’ will be published by Routledge in Spring 2016.

  • Publications

    A list of publications is available from the institutional repository, SHURA

    Feminism and Empire. Women Activists in Imperial Britain, 1790-1865 (London: Routledge, hb and pb eds, 2007)

    ‘British anti-slavery and feminism in transatlantic and imperial perspective’, in K.K. Sklar and J. Stewart, eds, Women’s Rights and Transatlantic Antislavery in the Era of Emancipation (Yale University Press, 2007)

    ‘Can women be missionaries? Envisioning female agency in the early nineteenth-century British empire’, Journal of British Studies, 45, 2 (April 2006), pp. 335-358

    ‘Bringing the empire home: women activists in imperial Britain, 1790s-1930s’ in Catherine Hall and Sonya Rose, eds, At Home with the Empire (Cambridge University Press, 2006)

    Entries on ‘Mary Estlin’, ‘Priscilla Buxton Johnson’, ‘Mary Lloyd’, ‘Elizabeth Pease Nichol’, ‘Anna Richardson’ and ‘Lucy Townsend’ for Brian Harrison and Colin Matthew, eds, The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004)

    ‘British Women, Women’s Rights and Empire, 1790-1850’ in Patricia Grimshaw, ed., Women’s Rights and Human Rights: International Historical Perspectives (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2001)

    ‘Feminist historians and challenges to imperial history’ in Anne-Marie Gallagher et al, eds., Representing the Past: Women and History (Harlow: Pearson Education, 2001)

    ‘From Supporting Missions to Petitioning Parliament: English Women and the Evangelical Campaign against Sati (Widow-Burning) in India, 1813-1830’ in Kathryn Gleadle and Sarah Richardson, eds., The Power of the Petticoat: Women in British Politics, 1780-1860 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2000)

    ‘Female emancipation in an imperial frame: English women and the campaign against sati (widow-burning) in India, 1813-1830’, Women’s History Review, 9, 1 (2000), 95-121

    Gender and Imperialism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, hb and pb, 1998).

    ‘Remember those in bonds, as bound with them’: Women’s approach to anti-slavery campaigning in Britain 1780-1870’ in Joan Grant, ed., Women, Migration and Empire Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham Books, 1996), pp. 73-102. Republished in Susan Findng, ed, The Abolition of Slavery in Britain (1787-1840). Debates and Dissension (Paris: Armand Colin, Editions Sedes, 2009), pp, 97-110.

    'Slave Sugar Boycotts, Female Activism and the Domestic Base of British Anti-Slavery Culture', Slavery and Abolition, 17, 3 (December 1996), 137-162.

    ‘Ethnicity, “race” and empire’ in June Purvis, ed., Women’s History. Britain, 1850-1945 (London: UCL Press, 1995)

    ‘Anti-slavery and feminism in Britain’, Gender & History, 5, 3 (Autumn 1993), 343-362

    Women Against Slavery: the British Campaigns, 1780-1870, (London: Routledge, h bed. 1992, pb. ed. 1995)

  • Other activities

    President, International Federation for Research in Women’s History, 2010-2015; co-convenor, ‘Reconfiguring the British’ and ‘Women’s History’ seminar series, Institute of Historical Research, London

  • Postgraduate supervision

    4

    1

  • Media

    Clare's research focuses on British women’s history, the history of British imperialism and transnational / global history. She has written several books and is currently working on a study of nineteenth-century networks of liberal religion and social reform which explores links between Bengali, American and British activists.

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