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Professor David James MEng. PhD.

Director


Summary

Professor David James is the Director of the Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER). David’s current research is focused sports mechanics, injury prevention and the ethical considerations of an increasingly scientific sporting arena. David is a visiting professor at TU Delft, Netherlands, and the Editor-in-chief of the 2017 International Conference on Sports Engineering in Jaipur, India. 

In addition to his research, David is the treasurer of the International Sports Engineering Association, grant reviewer for the Royal Academy of Engineering, project advisor to Research Councils UK, the Royal Institution and the Wellcome Trust. David was awarded the very first fellowship in public engagement from the Royal Academy of Engineering. He is a regular voice in broadcast and print media and delivers high profile keynote lectures on the role that technology plays in sport.

About

Professor David James is the Director of the Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER). His research is primarily focused on sports mechanics and injury; however, his interests also include sports performance analysis and sports ethics. David is a visiting professor at the TU Delft. 

David has a mechanical engineering background with a MEng from the University of Sheffield. During his degree, David also studied in Grenoble, France. David continued his studies at the University of Sheffield with a PhD in cricket dynamics sponsored by the ECB. 

David joined Sheffield Hallam University in 2006 and shortly after established the world-renowned MSc Sports Engineering programme. More recently, David established the Alliance for Sports Engineering Education to create an educational partnership with TU Delft (Netherlands) and TU Chemnitz (Germany).

David’s current research is focused on sports equipment mechanics and the ethical considerations of an increasingly scientific sporting arena. David supervises numerous PhD students on projects such as skin laceration risk in rugby, the efficacy of snowboard wrist protectors, and the effect of traction on player performance in football. 

In addition to his research David is the treasurer of the International Sports Engineering Association, grant reviewer for the Royal Academy of Engineering, project advisor to Research Councils UK, the Royal Institution and the Wellcome Trust. In 2014, David was the Editor-in-Chief of the International Sports Engineering Association Conference hosted in Sheffield.  

David is a leading international science communicator and was awarded the very first fellowship in public engagement from the Royal Academy of Engineering. He is a regular voice in broadcast and print media and delivers high profile keynote lectures on the role that technology plays in sport. David has appeared on countless stages including the Cheltenham Science Festival; Manchester Science Festival, the British Science Festival, and the Royal Institution’s Faraday lecture theatre.

Areas of interest:

  • Sports engineering
  • Sports equipment mechanics
  • Sports injury
  • Sports performance analysis
  • Sports ethics

Teaching

MSc Sports Engineering:

  • Mechanics of Sports Equipment

Research

Research centre:

Research theme groups:  

Current research projects: 

  • Fundamental studies on the flight of a dart
  • Effect of moment of inertia on swing speed 
  • Understanding stud laceration injuries in rugby and football
  • Understanding the efficacy of wrist guards in snowboarding 
  • The effect of traction on player performance in small sided football

Collaborators and sponsors: 

  • Labosport Ltd
  • FIFA
  • Adidas
  • World Rugby
  • Nova International
  • Royal Institution
  • Research Councils UK
  • Royal Academy of Engineering
  • Arts Council England
  • Engineering and Physical Science Research Council
  • European Social Fund
  • British CouncilInstitute of Physic

Publications

Journal articles

Trejo Ramirez, M.P., Wheat, J., James, D., Warmenhoven, J., & Hamilton, N. (2019). Evaluation of the effects of traction on ankle kinematics during a side cut using bfPCA (abstract only). Footwear Science, 11 (sup1), S25-S27. http://doi.org/10.1080/19424280.2019.1606059

Hart, J., Potts, J., & James, D. (2018). Comparison of turbulence modelling approaches in simulation of a feather shuttle; a porous conical bluff body. Sports Engineering, 21 (4), 465-478. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12283-018-0293-y

Adams, C., James, D., Senior, T., Allen, T., & Hamilton, N. (2018). Correction to: Effect of surrogate design on the measured stiffness of snowboarding wrist protectors (Sports Engineering, (2018), 21, 3, (217-225), 10.1007/s12283-018-0266-1). Sports Engineering, 21 (3), 227. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12283-018-0275-0

Adams, C., James, D., Senior, T., Allen, T., & Hamilton, N. (2018). Effect of surrogate design on the measured stiffness of snowboarding wrist protectors. Sports Engineering, 15, 42. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12283-018-0266-1

James, D., & Potts, J. (2018). Experimental validation of dynamic stability analysis applied to dart flight. Sports Engineering, 21, 347-358. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12283-018-0279-9

Dunn, M., Hart, J., & James, D. (2018). Wearing electronic performance and tracking system devices in Association Football: Potential injury scenarios and associated impact energies. Proceedings, 2 (6), 232-237. http://doi.org/10.3390/proceedings2060232

Oudshoorn, B., Driscoll, H., Dunn, M., Senior, T., & James, D. (2017). Development of a test method for assessing laceration injury risk of individual cleats during game-relevant loading conditions. Footwear Science, 10 (1), 1-10. http://doi.org/10.1080/19424280.2017.1403969

Oudshoorn, B., Driscoll, H., Kilner, K., Dunn, M., & James, D. (2017). Prevalence of laceration injuries in professional and amateur rugby union: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine, 3 (1), e000239. http://doi.org/10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000239

Oudshoorm, B.Y., Driscoll, H.F., Dunn, M., & James, D. (2017). Identifying representative test parameters to assess skin laceration injury risk for individual studs. Footwear Science, 9 (sup1), S29-S31. http://doi.org/10.1080/19424280.2017.1313904

Oudshoorn, B., Driscoll, H., Dunn, M., & James, D. (2017). Kinetic and kinematic analysis of stamping impacts during simulated rucking in rugby union. Journal of Sports Sciences, 36 (8), 914-919. http://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2017.1346273

Adams, C., James, D., Senior, T., Allen, T., & Hamilton, N. (2016). Development of a method for measuring quasi-static stiffness of snowboard wrist protectors. Procedia Engineering, 147, 378-383. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.320

Schorah, D., Choppin, S., & James, D. (2015). Effects of moment of inertia on restricted motion swing speed. Sports Biomechanics, 14 (2), 157-167. http://doi.org/10.1080/14763141.2015.1027949

Foster, L.I., Haake, S., James, D.M., & Nevill, A.M. (2014). Modelling effects of drug testing procedures on performance trends in the shot put. Journal of Sports Medicine & Doping Studies, 4 (5). http://doi.org/10.4172/2161-0673.1000151

Haake, S., James, D., & Foster, L. (2014). An improvement index to quantify the evolution of performance in field events. Journal of Sports Sciences, 33 (3), 255-267. http://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2014.938099

Haake, S., Foster, L., & James, D. (2014). An improvement index to quantify the evolution of performance in running. Journal of Sports Sciences, 32 (7), 610-622. http://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2013.841974

James, D. (2012). Extraordinary moves: the art of science in the cultural Olympiad. Moving Worlds, 12 (1), 136-147.

James, D. (2012). Engineering a sporting chance? Institute of Engineering and Technology, 6, 7. https://www.theiet.org/membership/member-news/30/opinion.cfm?

James, D. (2012). Development of equipment for use in sport. School Science Review, 93 (345), 77-84. http://www.ase.org.uk/journals/school-science-review/2012/06/345/

James, D. (2011). Fair Game? Ingenia, 47, 15-21. http://www.ingenia.org.uk/Ingenia/Articles/664

James, D. (2008). The physics of winning - engineering the world of sport. Physics education, 43 (5), 500-505. http://doi.org/10.1088/0031-9120/43/5/006

James, D. (2008). Slight advantage. Engineer, 293 (7747), 34.

Carre, M.J., James, D.M., & Haake, S. (2006). Hybrid method for assessing the performance of sports surfaces during ball impacts. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, part L: Journal of materials: design and application, 220 (1), 31-39. http://doi.org/10.1243/14644207JMDA78

Adams, W.A., Baker, S.W., James, D.M., & Young, R.J. (2005). Measuring and modelling the bounce and pace of county championship cricket pitches. International turfgrass society journal, 10, 1021-1026.

James, D.M., Carre, M.J., & Haake, S. (2005). Predicting the playing character of cricket pitches. Sports engineering, 8 (4), 193-207. http://doi.org/10.1007/BF02844162

Carre, M.J., James, D.M., & Haake, S. (2004). Impact of a non-homogeneous sphere on a rigid surface. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, part C: Journal of mechanical engineering science, 218 (3), 273-281. http://doi.org/10.1243/095440604322900408

James, D.M., Carre, M.J., & Haake, S. (2004). The playing performance of county cricket pitches. Sports engineering, 7 (1), 1-14. http://www.springerlink.com/content/h4534450x8601582/

Conference papers

Oudshoorn, B., Driscoll, H.F., Dunn, M., & James, D. (2016). Causation events of stud laceration injuries in rugby union. Procedia Engineering, 147, 496-500. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.227

Oudshoorn, B., Driscoll, H.F., Dunn, M., & James, D. (2016). Pressure sensor calibration for measuring stud-player impacts. Procedia Engineering, 147, 688-693. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.273

Emery, J., Driscoll, H.F., Barnes, A., & James, D.M. (2016). A method for characterizing high acceleration movements in small-sided football. Procedia Engineering, 147, 718-723. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.256

Emery, J., Driscoll, H.F., Barnes, A., & James, D. (2016). Third generation artificial pitch quality in commercial football centers. Procedia Engineering, 147, 860-865. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2016.06.289

Schorah, D., Choppin, S., & James, D. (2014). Effect of moment of inertia and physical profile on restricted motion swing speed. Procedia Engineering, 72, 593-598. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.086

Allen, T., Gough, J., Koncan, D., James, D., Morales, E., & Wood, P. (2014). Modelling the acoustics of a golf ball impacting a titanium plate. Procedia Engineering, 72, 587-592. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.101

Allen, T., Fauteux-Brault, O., James, D., & Curtis, D. (2014). Finite element model of a cricket ball impacting a bat. Procedia Engineering, 72, 521-526. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.090

Pope, J., James, D., Wood, P., & Henrikson, E. (2014). The effect of skid distance on distance control in golf putting. Procedia Engineering, 72, 642-647. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.109

Dé, R., & James, D. (2014). The effect of stud shape on penetration characteristics through synthesized natural turf in football. Procedia Engineering, 72, 648-653. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.110

Kelley, J. (2014). A camera calibration method for a hammer throw analysis tool. Procedia Engineering, 72 (72), 74-79. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.002

Foster, L.I., Haake, S.J., James, D.M., & Nevill, A.M. (2014). A Method To Objectively Gauge The Influence Of Drug Testing Procedures On Athletic Performance. MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 46 (5), 893. http://doi.org/10.1249/01.mss.0000496180.59745.ea

James, D. (2014). Preface. Procedia Engineering, 72, 1-2. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.001

Schorah, D., Choppin, S., & James, D. (2012). Investigating the relationship between swing weight and swing speed across different sports using historical data. Procedia engineering, 34, 766-771. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2012.04.131

Allen, T., Bowley, A., Wood, P., Henrikson, E., Morales, E., & James, D. (2012). Effect of temperature on golf ball dynamics. Procedia engineering, 34, 634-639. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2012.04.108

James, D., Curtis, D., Allen, T., & Rippin, T. (2012). The validity of a rigid body model of a cricket ball-bat impact. Procedia engineering, 34, 682-687. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2012.04.116

James, D., MacDonald, D.C., & Hart, J. (2012). The effect of atmospheric conditions on the swing of a cricket ball. Procedia engineering, 34, 188-193. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2012.04.033

Foster, L., James, D., & Haake, S. (2012). Influence of full body swimsuits on competitive performance. Procedia engineering, 34, 712-717. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2012.04.121

Wiart, N., Kelley, J., James, D., & Allen, T. (2011). Effect of temperature on the dynamic properties of soccer balls. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part P: Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology, 225 (4), 189-198. http://doi.org/10.1177/1754337111411644

Foster, L., James, D., & Haake, S. (2011). The influence of the Olympic Games on athletic performance. In 3rd International Conference on Mathematics in Sport, Salford, Manchester.

James, D. (2010). The ethics of using engineering to enhance athletic performance. Procedia engineering, 2 (2), 3405-3410. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2010.04.165

Foster, L., James, D., & Haake, S. (2010). Understanding the influence of population size on athletic performance. Procedia engineering, 2 (2), 3183-3189. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2010.04.130

James, D.M., & Haake, S. (2008). The spin decay of sports balls in flight. The engineering of sport 7, 165-170. http://doi.org/10.1007/978-2-287-09413-2_20

Book chapters

Henderson, A., Lai, D., & Allen, T. (2014). A modern approach to determine the offside law in international football. In James, D., Choppin, S., Allen, T., Wheat, J., & Fleming, P. (Eds.) The engineering of sport. (pp. 138-143). Elsevier: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.proeng.2014.06.025

James, D., Carre, M.J., & Haake, S. (2006). Studies on the oblique impact of a cricket ball on a cricket pitch. In Moritz, E.F., & Haake, S.J. (Eds.) The engineering of sport 6. (pp. 235-240). Springer: http://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-46050-5_42

James, D.M., & Haake, S. (2006). Using sport to educate and enthuse young people about engineering the physical sciences. In Moritz, E.F., & Haake, S. (Eds.) The engineering of sport 6. (pp. 273-278). Springer: http://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-45951-6_49

James, D., Carre, M.J., & Haake, S. (2004). The normal impact of a cricket ball on a cricket pitch. In Hubbard, M., Mehta, R.D., & Pallis, J.M. (Eds.) The engineering of sport 5. (pp. 66-72). International sport engineering association

James, D.M., Carre, M.J., & Haake, S. (2002). The dynamic behaviour of a cricket ball impact and the effects of pitch construction. In Ujihashi, S., & Haake, S.J. (Eds.) The engineering of sport 4. (pp. 494-500). Blackwell

Reports

Adams, W.A., Baker, S.W., Carre, M.J., Young, R.J., & James, D.M. (2004). Pitch properties and performance. England and Wales Cricket Board. http://static.ecb.co.uk/files/pitch-properties-and-performance-315.pdf

Theses / Dissertations

Oudshoorn, B. (2018). Development of a test method to evaluate laceration risk of studded footwear. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by James, D. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00090

Schorah, D.J. (2015). The effect of moment of inertia on the speed of swung implements. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by James, D., & Choppin, S.

Foster, L.I. (2012). Modelling the effect of technology on elite sport. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by James, D., & Haake, S.

Presentations

Haake, S., James, D., & Foster, L. (2010). The effect of technological interventions: do they work? Presented at: Japan's Symposium on Sports and Human Dynamics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2010

Other activities

  • Visiting professor at TU Delft, Netherlands
  • Editor-in-chief of the 2017 International Conference on Sports Engineering, Jaipur, India.
  • Treasurer of the International Sports Engineering Association.Grant and project reviewer for several UK funding bodies.
  • Editor-in-chief of the 2014 International Sports Engineering Association conference.
  • Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Ambassador.
  • Contributed to House of Lords report on sports science (2012). 
  • Member of joint Royal Academies select committee on human enhancement (2010).

Postgraduate supervision

Current supervised PhD students:

  • Oudshoorn, B. Understanding stud laceration injuries in rugby and football 
  • Adams, C. Understanding the efficacy of wrist guards in snowboarding 
  • The effect of traction on player performance in small sided football

Completed supervised PhD students:

  • Schorah, D. The effect of moment of inertia on the speed of a swung implement, July 2015.
  •  Foster, L. Modelling the effect of technology on elite sport, September 2012

Completed postgraduate examinations:

  • MPhil Internal: 1
  • MPhil External: 0
  • PhD Internal: 3
  • PhD External: 2

Media

Professor David James is the Director of the Centre for Sports Engineering Research at Sheffield Hallam University. David is a leading science communicator specialising in sports equipment mechanics. David’s current research is focused on sports equipment mechanics and the ethical considerations of an increasingly scientific sporting arena. David is a visiting professor at TU Delft, Netherlands. 

In addition to his research David is the treasurer of the International Sports Engineering Association, grant reviewer for the Royal Academy of Engineering, project advisor to Research Councils UK, the Royal Institution and the Wellcome Trust. The Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER) is led by Dr David James. It is the world's largest academic group in sports engineering and an internationally renowned centre of excellence for research and knowledge transfer. 

The centre's work is based on four research disciplines; applied computing, biomechanics, design engineering, and skill acquisition. In each area, researchers develop fundamental knowledge and deliver applied solutions to enhance athletic performance, reduce injury and promote physical activity.  

CSER works in partnership with many sport, health and commercial organisations. We are immensely proud of our work with Team GB Olympic, and Paralympic athletes, and we enjoy research partnerships with global organisations such as the International Tennis Federation, FIFA, and Adidas.

Areas of expertise:

  • Sports engineering
  • Sports equipment mechanics
  • Sports injury
  • Sports performance analysis
  • Sports ethics

Notable media coverage:

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