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  4. Professor Helen Richardson

Prof Helen Richardson

Professor Of Gender And Organisation


Summary

I am a qualified and experienced teacher. My teaching is research-led and I contribute mainly to the doctoral programmes at Sheffield Business School.

I have enjoyed guiding 9 students to the successful completion of their doctoral studies. My current PhD and DBA students are researching intersectionality and leadership in South Africa; women managers in the banking sector in Nigeria; identity, branding and self-esteem of teenage competitive swimmers and emotional labour conflict in the legal profession.

I am an active and enthusiastic researcher with wide-ranging interests and publications concerning the broad area of employment and gender matters in the global knowledge economy. This includes research in the areas of IT-led services; gender and the ICT labour market; how lean methods are applied in the public sector and the consequences of flexible contracts of employment in the UK labour market.

I have secured over £660,000 in research grants mainly regard to the under-representation of women working in the ICT sector. This has informed government and European policy on the gender pay gap and promoting good practice, with a number of publications arising from these projects.

About

Qualifications

  • 2005: PhD Cultures of Consumption: gender and home e-shopping in the global knowledge economy, University of Salford, United Kingdom
  • 1996: MSc Computation, UMIST University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, United Kingdom
  • 1984: MA Women's Studies, University of Kent, United Kingdom
  • 1979: BA Political Theory and Institutions and Economic and Social History, University of Sheffield, United Kingdom

Professor of Gender and Organisation

Teaching

Department of Management

Sheffield Business School

OBHRM

Publications

Journal articles

Richardson, H. (2018). Programming inequality. How Britain discarded women technologists and lost its edge in computing. Marie Hicks. MIT Press. 2018. New technology, work and employment, 33 (3), 268-270. http://doi.org/10.1111/ntwe.12121

Dhar-Battercharjee, S., & Richardson, H. (2018). A tour of India in one workplace: investigating complex and gendered relations in IT. Information Technology and People, 31 (2), 578-594. http://doi.org/10.1108/ITP-08-2015-0198

Kamerade, D., & Richardson, H. (2018). Gender segregation, underemployment and subjective well-being in the UK labour market. Human Relations, 71 (2), 285-309. http://doi.org/10.1177/0018726717713829

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2016). Uncomfortable truths - teamworking under lean in the UK. International Journal of Human Resource Management, 28 (3), 449-467. http://doi.org/10.1080/09585192.2015.1111251

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2014). 'They can't be the buffer any longer': front-line managers and class relations under white-collar lean production. Capital and Class, 38 (2), 323-343. http://doi.org/10.1177/0309816814532409

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2013). 'Stressed out of my box': employee experience of lean working and occupational ill-health in clerical work in the UK public sector. Work, employment and society, 27 (5), 747-767. http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017012469064

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2013). Taxing times: lean working and the creation of (in)efficiencies in HM Revenue and Customs. Public Administration, 91 (1), 83-97. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9299.2012.02073.x

Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (2012). The back office goes global: exploring connections and contradictions in shared service centres. Work, employment and society, 26 (1), 111-127. http://doi.org/10.1177/0950017011426309

Belgorodskiy, A., Crump, B., Griffiths, M., Logan, K., Peter, R., & Richardson, H. (2012). The gender pay gap in the ICT labour market : comparative experiences from the UK and New Zealand. New Technology, Work and Employment, 27 (2), 106-119. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-005X.2012.00281.x

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2012). 'Nothing gets done and no-one knows why': PCS and workplace control of Lean in HM Revenue and Customs. Industrial Relations Journal, 43 (5), 416-432. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2338.2012.00679.x

Carter, B., Danford, A., Howcroft, D., Richardson, H., Smith, A., & Taylor, P. (2011). Lean and mean in the civil service: the case of processing in HMRC. Public Money and Management, 31 (2), 115-122.

Richardson, H. (2011). ‘All they lack is a chain’: lean and the new performance management in the British civil service. New Technology, Work and Employment, 26 (2), 83-97. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-005X.2011.00261.x

Zanoni, P. (2011). Work and life in the global economy: a gendered analysis of service work - Edited by Debra Howcroft and Helen Richardson. New Technology, Work and Employment, 26 (1), 78-79. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-005x.2010.00259_1.x

Richardson, H. (2009). A ‘smart house’ is not a home : the domestication of ICTs. Information Systems Frontiers, 11 (5), 599-608. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-008-9137-9

Richardson, H. (2009). Taking a feminist approach to information systems research and using the “thinking tools” provided by the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. Information Technology and People, 22 (1), 26-35. http://doi.org/10.1108/09593840910937472

Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (2008). Gender matters in the global outsourcing of service work. New Technology, Work and Employment, 23 (1-2), 44-60. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-005X.2008.00202.x

Moore, K., Griffiths, M., Richardson, H., & Adam, A. (2008). Gendered futures? Women, the ICT workplace and stories of the future. Gender, work and organisation, 15 (5), 543-542. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0432.2008.00416.x

Gillard, H., Howcroft, D., Mitev, N., & Richardson, H. (2008). "Missing women": Gender, ICTs, and the shaping of the global economy. Information Technology for Development, 14 (4), 262-279. http://doi.org/10.1002/itdj.20098

Richardson, H., & Robinson, B. (2007). The mysterious case of the missing paradigm: A review of critical information systems research 1991-2001. Information Systems Journal, 17 (3), 251-270. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2575.2007.00230.x

Kreps, D., & Richardson, H. (2007). Is success and failure - The problem of scale. Political Quarterly, 78 (3), 439-446. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-923X.2007.00871.x

Richardson, H., Tapia, A., & Kvasny, L. (2006). Introduction: Applying critical theory to the study of ICT. Social Science Computer Review, 24 (3), 267-273. http://doi.org/10.1177/0894439306287971

Kvasny, L., & Richardson, H. (2006). Critical research in information systems: Looking forward, looking back. Information Technology & People, 19 (3), 196-202. http://doi.org/10.1108/09593840610689813

Richardson, H.J., & Howcroft, D. (2006). The contradictions of CRM - A critical lens on call centres. Information and Organization, 16 (2), 143-168. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoandorg.2005.10.002

Adam, A., Griffiths, M., Keogh, C., Moore, K., Richardson, H., & Tattersall, A. (2006). Being an 'it' in IT: Gendered identities in IT work. European Journal of Information Systems, 15 (4), 368-378. http://doi.org/10.1057/palgrave.ejis.3000631

Richardson, H.J., & Howcroft, D. (2006). The contradictions of CRM - A critical lens on call centres. Information and Organization, 16 (1), 56-81. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.infoandorg.2005.10.001

Adam, A., Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (2004). A decade of neglect: Reflecting on gender and IS. New Technology, Work and Employment, 19 (3), 222-240. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-005X.2004.00139.x

Adam, A., & Richardson, H. (2001). Feminist Philosophy and Information Systems. Information Systems Frontiers, 3 (2), 143-154. http://doi.org/10.1023/A:1011487221497

Book chapters

Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (2016). A gendered analysis of IT-enabled service work in the global economy. In Peterson, H. (Ed.) Gender in Transnational Knowledge Work. (pp. 11-30). Switzerland: Springer

Griffiths, M., & Richardson, H. (2010). Against all odds: from all-girls schools to all-boys workplaces. In Booth, S., Goodman, S., & Kirkup, G. (Eds.) Gender issues in learning and working with IT. (1st). (pp. 99-112). Pennsylvania: IGI Global

Hynes, D., & Richardson, H. (2009). What use is domestication theory to information systems research? In Handbook of Research on Contemporary Theoretical Models in Information Systems. (pp. 482-494). http://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-60566-659-4.ch027

Richardson, H. (2005). Consuming passions in the ‘global knowledge economy’. In Handbook of Critical Information Systems Research: Theory and Application. (pp. 272-298). http://doi.org/10.4337/9781845426743.00021

Books

Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (Eds.). (2010). Work and life in the global economy: a gendered analysis of service work. Palgrave Macmillan.

Howcroft, D., & Richardson, H. (Eds.). (2010). Work and life in the global economy: a gendered analysis of service work. Palgrave Macmillan.

Reports

Ball, M., Hampton, C., Kamerade, D., & Richardson, H. (2017). Agency workers and zero hours - the story of hidden exploitation. Derbyshire Unemployed Workers Centres.

Theses / Dissertations

Goodwin, J. (2020). The employee voice of older local government workers: a critical perspective. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Prowse, P., Bennett, A., & Taylor, C. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00368

Parikh, V. (2018). An Exploration of Contact Centre Service Management Within a Service Science Context. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Johnston, A., & Richardson, H.

Fidment, S.E. (2016). Who do you think you are? A hermeneutic study of leaders' identities. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Mcauley, J., & Richardson, H.

Bourne, T. (2016). Researching the entrepreneurial journeys, barriers and drivers of women portfolio entrepreneurs. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Richardson, H., & Doherty, L.

Beeka, B.H. (2015). Entrepreneurship as a viable career choice for Nigerian youth. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Richardson, H., Rimmington, M., & Ball, S.

Other publications

Adam, A., Basden, A., Richardson, H., & Robinson, B. (n.d.). Critical reflections on critical research in information systems.

Other activities

Competitve Research Award

  • 2016: £14, 132 ESRC Fund, Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), United Kingdom

Postgraduate supervision

Sarina Saiger (2008) An ethnographic study of ‘Connecting for Health’ in an NHS Trust
Tayfour Mohammed (2009) A critical ethnography of IT Services project implementation
Claire Keogh (2010) A critical feminist investigation of work-life balance in the ICT sector
Angela Tattersall (2010) A critical feminist investigation of gender and social capital in the ICT sector
Sunrita Dhar-Battacharjee (2014) Women ICT professionals in the UK and India
Beema Beeka (2015) Entrepreneuship and Nigerian Youth
Terri Bourne (2016) Women portfolio entrepreneurs
Sarah Fidment (2016) Senior leaders and identity
Vishal Parikh (2018) IT led service management

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