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BA (Honours) English and History

Discover the making of the modern world and explore how literature engages with it.

Course length 3 Years
Location City Campus
UCAS QV31 Course code

Course description

What you study

You study the social, cultural, political and economic history of a range of countries, continents and regions, including Britain, Europe, America, Australia, India and Africa in the late eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. You can also study imperial and global history.

You study the growth of drama with Shakespeare and his contemporaries, and engage with the remarkable 18th century, which began with the rise of capital and of the novel and culminated in the French Revolution and the Romantics. Its dark repressed side emerges in the literature of the gothic genre, which you trace through to the present day. Examine the impact of the Industrial Revolution and its representation in nineteenth-century literature, and the controversies of the twentieth century and beyond in modules such as censorship, scandal and conflict and in darkest England.

In every module you find an inspiring range of possibilities to develop your own skills of analysis and critical interpretation.

Building your confidence for your future career is central to the course, and you can take the opportunity to expand your horizons through learning a language, studying abroad, or gaining professional experience on work-related modules.

How you learn

As well as learning in the classroom through lectures and seminars, you may have classes in computer suites with access to a range of academic digital collections. Field trips also enrich your learning. Recent trips have included • Manchester People's History Museum • the Museum of London • London's Globe Theatre • country houses and archives.

We are situated in the heart of the city within easy walking distance of local theatres and the Showroom cinema. Typical learning enrichment activities include student involvement in Sheffield’s annual Off the Shelf Festival of Words, and visits to the Crucible Theatre.

As you progress, you develop your own research skills. The culmination of the course is your final year multidisciplinary dissertation for which you research a topic of your own choice with support from a specialist supervisor.

Work-based learning and placements

We place a strong emphasis on developing your employability and career management skills. As part of your degree, you can choose to complete a work-related project either within the University or with an external organisation.

Our students have

• completed research projects for community-based history projects, museums and a local playwright

• undertaken oral history interviews for a national organisation documenting the history of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement

• written for the 'South Yorkshire Through Time' website

• raised funds and awareness for ASSIST (Asylum Seeker Support Initiative Short Term)

• researched and transcribed for Settle Stories (Performing Arts Theatre)

• worked with local MPs, charities and pressure groups, and the Citizens Advice Bureau

Alternatively, you can complete a placement in a school, typically one day a week from November to March.

Study abroad

This course offers you the opportunity to study abroad during your second year. Employers like to see these experiences on a CV as they demonstrate independence, confidence and adaptability.

Sheffield Hallam University has Erasmus and international study exchange agreements with over 100 institutions in 25 different countries. Current exchange locations for students include • Prague, Czech Republic • Linköping, Sweden • Paris, France • Neuchatel, Switzerland • Georgia, USA • Ontario, Canada • Victoria, Australia.

Support

You will be assigned to a personal tutor for small-group academic-advice sessions, which will enable you to develop study skills and time management skills, and to discuss your career plans in a supportive environment.

Facilities

You can draw on the resources of our excellent library facilities which are open 24 hours every day of the year.

Entry requirements

2017 entry requirements

GCSE English language at grade C or Grade 4 or above. We do not accept GCSE equivalents. Plus one of the following

• 112 UCAS points from at least two A levels or equivalent BTEC National qualifications, including at least 32 points in English literature or history. We accept AS levels. We accept general studies.

Or

• 96 UCAS points from three A levels or equivalent BTEC National qualifications, including at least 32 points in English literature or history. We accept general studies.

New UCAS tariff points system for courses starting from September 2017. This is significantly different to the current points system and uses an alternative method of calculation. You can find information about these changes on the UCAS website and use the UCAS tariff calculator to work out your points.

• Access – at least 45 credits at level 3 from a relevant Open College Network accredited course

If English is not your first language you need an IELTS average score of 6.5 with a minimum score of 5.5 in all skills.

We consider other qualifications from the UCAS tariff. Applicants with alternative qualifications or a combination of qualifications and work experience are also considered. We welcome applications from people of any age. Please contact us for further advice.

Meeting the qualifications on the entry criteria does not guarantee you a place. You should ensure that you submit a personal statement and reference as these are considered as part of the selection process. Guidelines on personal statements and references can be found on the UCAS website.

2018 entry requirements

GCSE English language at grade C or Grade 4 or above. We do not accept GCSE equivalents. Plus one of the following

• 112 UCAS points from at least two A levels or equivalent BTEC National qualifications, including at least 32 points in English literature or history. We accept AS levels. We accept general studies.

Or

• 96 UCAS points from three A levels or equivalent BTEC National qualifications, including at least 32 points in English literature or history. We accept general studies.

New UCAS tariff points system for courses starting from September 2017. This is significantly different to the current points system and uses an alternative method of calculation. You can find information about these changes on the UCAS website and use the UCAS tariff calculator to work out your points.

• Access – at least 45 credits at level 3 from a relevant Open College Network accredited course

If English is not your first language you need an IELTS average score of 6.5 with a minimum score of 5.5 in all skills.

We consider other qualifications from the UCAS tariff. Applicants with alternative qualifications or a combination of qualifications and work experience are also considered. We welcome applications from people of any age. Please contact us for further advice.

Meeting the qualifications on the entry criteria does not guarantee you a place. You should ensure that you submit a personal statement and reference as these are considered as part of the selection process. Guidelines on personal statements and references can be found on the UCAS website.

International and European entry qualifications

If you are an International or non-UK European student, you can find out more about the country specific qualifications we accept on our international qualifications page.

Course structure

Three years full-time

Typical modules may include

Year one

• epic transformations • the making of Modern Britain 1780-1918 • literature of war and peace • nationalism, democracy and socialism in Modern Europe • introduction to critical theory • empires and encounters • modern foreign languages

Year two

• London: literary and historical perspectives 1728-1914 • literary theory and the philosophy of literature • Germany 1890-1933: from Reich to republic • Britain and America in the interwar years • race and nation • the Cold War era • Eastern Europe 1945-1989 • total war and European society 1792-1945 • the city of London and the British economy since 1870 • Shakespearean drama • the Gothic • crossing over: power, death and desire • children's literature • literature of the 18th century and Romantic Period • applied history: work and community • modern foreign languages • international exchange

Year three

• English and history dissertation (you choose your own research topic) • censorship, conflict and scandal • literature of the twentieth century • renaissance literature • Victorian literature • in darkest England: fiction at work, 1880-1915 • history and the historical novel • American politics and society since 1968 • Australia: penal settlement to nation, 1788-2000 • Chartism: working-class politics and culture in Britain, 1838-48 • community engagement and civic activism • citizenship, violence and race: Germans and Africans in colonial and postcolonial encounters • European orientalism: from colonisation to decolonisation • India and the British Raj, 1765-1947 • industrial warfare and Britain and the great war 1914-1918 • northern soul: regional identities in the north of England, 1800 to the present • rise and decline of soviet communism • South Africa in the twentieth century • modern foreign language option

Assessment
  • presentations
  • posters
  • project work
  • portfolios
  • blogs
  • analysing electronic sources
  • essays
  • exams (including take-home exams)
  • dissertation

Employability

This course offers highly-valued transferable skills, including • enhanced written and oral communication • digital fluency • independence of thought • gathering, assessing and interpreting evidence • evaluating arguments.

Our graduates have developed careers in many diverse fields, including • local government • human resources • advertising • financial services • the media and journalism • librarianship • teaching • the heritage industry • law • human resources.

Many of our graduates go on to take further qualifications at masters or PhD level.

Fees

Home / EU student

Please note tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, subject to government regulations on fee increases and in line with inflation. More information can be found in the ‘Tuition Fee Increases’ section of our Fees Regulations (PDF, 2.10 MB)

For the course fee and further information on scholarships and bursaries please visit our fees and funding pages.

International student

2016/17 academic year

Typically £12,250 a year

2017/18 academic year

Typically £12,750 a year

Additional course costs

This link allows you to view estimated costs associated with the main activities on specific courses. These are estimates and, as such, are only an indication of additional course costs. Actual costs can vary greatly depending on the choices you make during your course.

Additional costs information

How to apply

You apply for this course through UCAS.

Any offer of a place to study is subject to your acceptance of the University’s Terms and Conditions and student Regulations.

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