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  4. Ana Maria Sanchez-Arce

Dr Ana Maria Sanchez-Arce PGCE (Autónoma de Barcelona), MA (Hull), MA (Autónoma de Barcelona), PhD (Hull)

Reader in English


Summary

My research specialisms are contemporary literature, global literature, and film. Identity and form, trauma and censorship, best sum up my work. My approach is interdisciplinary with a focus on issues of social justice and human rights in relation to gender and race. I interpret texts by writers who are considered mainstream alongside those who are classed as migrant, postcolonial or world writers. I analyse how culturally prescribed interpretive frameworks affect readings of contemporary literature by writers racialised as non-white. My teaching reflects my research interests and I teach on a range of undergraduate modules and supervise postgraduate students across English and Film Studies.

 

About

I work on identity and form in both contemporary literature and film, employing postcolonial, feminist, formalist, and cultural materialist methodologies. In recent years, I have been writing on censorship and the expression of trauma in literature and film. My research on censorship has resulted in a book on the legacy of the Spanish Civil War and dictatorship, The cinema of Pedro Almodóvar (Manchester University Press, 2020). This is the only film-by-film book to cover all Almodóvar’s 21 films and some of his experimental shorts. It argues that Almodóvar's work is a form of social critique, his films engaging with stereotypes about traditional and contemporary Spain to address Spain's traumatic historical past and how it informs the present. My focus is on social justice and human rights and I am particularly interested in issues around race, gender and migration. I analyse how culturally prescribed interpretive frameworks affect readings of contemporary literature by Black British, British Asian and migrant writers.  My first co-edited collection (with Patsy Stoneman and Angela Leighton), European Intertexts: Women’s Writing in English in a European Context (Peter Lang, 2005), explores the interdependence of English and continental European literatures in writing and films by women. My contribution to the collection tackles definitions of ‘Europe’ in a postcolonial world. This volume and another four edited collections were the outcomes of a British Academy funded network (1999–2004) for which I was assistant co-ordinator. My second edited collection, Identity and Form in Contemporary Literature (Routledge, 2014), revises the binary oppositions – identity-form, content-form and body-mind – through discussions of the role of the author, the ways in which writers embrace or bypass identity politics, and the function of identity and the body in literary form. My own essay considers what factors lead to writers such as Kazuo Ishiguro to be categorised as world writers and how this affects interpretations of their work. I am currently co-editing a collection of essays with Jonathan Ellis, Remembering Annie Hall (Bloomsbury, forthcoming 2022), my contribution to which will include an essay on the film’s intertextual relation to Almodóvar’s Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. I am also planning a new project on Censorship in Global Literature.

 

Specialist areas of interest

Equality and diversity issues in contemporary British literature. 

Teaching

Department of Humanities

Social Sciences and Arts

I am currently assisting second year students in collaborating with Reading Sheffield, a community voluntary group. Students are writing their personal reading journeys and researching and writing blogs about popular early twentieth-century fiction.  Projects I am currently planning which will involve students are a Censorship Week and further collaborations with Reading Sheffield.   In the past, I have collaborated with Sheffield Central Library to organise an exhibition of final year students’ work on censorship. 

 

English, Department of Humanities

• BA English • BA English Literature • PhD

 

• Censorship, Conflict and Scandal • Contemporary Fiction • Ideas into Action • Literature Dissertation

Research

• Remembering Annie Hall (co-edited collection with Dr J. Ellis, Bloomsbury, 2022)

• Censorship in Global Literature

• The role of perceived authorial identity in the reception of contemporary literature in Japan and the UK (with Professor Mitoko Hirabayashi, Nagoya University).

 

Voice 4Change UK Member of the Human Rights and Literature Network, run by the Human Rights Institute (Binghamton University, USA).

Member of the British Association for Contemporary Literary Studies (BACLS).

Member of the Contemporary Women’s Writing Association (CWWA)

Founding member and co-organiser, multidisciplinary network Migration, Cultures and Communities. Participating universities: SHU, The University of Sheffield.

Member of the Northern Postcolonial Network. Human Rights Symposium organisation 2015.

Member of Multicultural Textualities, a research network established to explore the contribution that literary and other textual representations make to our understanding of multicultural societies and the place of non-white, non-secular citizens within them. Participating universities: Queen Mary, Sheffield Hallam, SOAS, Southampton, UEA, York.

Member of the Postcolonial Studies Association (Conference Committee 2014–15).

Founding member and assistant co-ordinator, British Academy funded network, European Intertexts: A Study of Women’s Writing in English as Part of a European Fabric.

 

Publications

Journal articles

Sánchez-Arce, A.M. (2018). Performing innocence: violence and the nation in Ian McEwan’s Saturday and Sunjeev Sahota’s Ours Are the Streets. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, 53 (2), 194-210. http://doi.org/10.1177/0021989416686648

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2007). "Authenticism," or the authority of authenticity (Percival Everett's 'Erasure'). MOSAIC-A JOURNAL FOR THE INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF LITERATURE, 40 (3), 139-155.

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2007). Authenticism, or, the authority of authenticity. Mosaic: a journal for the interdisciplinary study of literature, 40 (3), 139-155.

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2002). Re-seeding "Englishness": agonism in Timothy Mo's Sour Sweet and Hanif Kureishi's The Buddha of Surburbia. Southeast Asian review of English.

Book chapters

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2013). Identity and form in contemporary literature : an introduction. In Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.) Identity and form in contemporary literature. (pp. 1-15). Routledge

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2013). Identity and form in contemporary literature : an introduction. In Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.) Identity and form in contemporary literature. (pp. 1-15). Routledge

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2013). Why Kazuo Ishiguro is stuck to the margins : formal identities in contemporary literary interpretations. In Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.) Identity and form in contemporary literature. (pp. 140-157). Routledge

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2013). Why Kazuo Ishiguro is stuck to the margins : formal identities in contemporary literary interpretations. In Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.) Identity and form in contemporary literature. (pp. 140-157). Routledge

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2012). Meera Syal. In British Writers : Supplement XIX, 19th ed. Gale/Charles Scribner's Sons

Ellis, J., & Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2011). The unquiet dead : memories of the Spanish Civil War in Guillermo del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth. In Sinha, A., & McSweeney, T. (Eds.) Millennial cinema : memory in global film. (pp. 173-191). New York: Columbia University Press

Books

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (2020). The cinema of Pedro Almodovar. (1st). Manchester University Press.

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.). (2013). Identity and form in contemporary literature. Routledge.

Sanchez-Arce, A.M. (Ed.). (2013). Identity and form in contemporary literature. Routledge.

Theses / Dissertations

Hutson, E. (2019). Lived Experience and Literature:Trans Authors, Trans Fiction and Trans Theory. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Sanchez-Arce, A.M. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00217

Earnshaw, A.R. (2017). Taboo : why are real-life British serial killers rarely represented on film? (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by O'Brien, S., & Sanchez-Arce, A.M. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00063

Other publications

(2005). European Intertexts: Women's Writing in English in a European Context. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang

Other activities

Member of the Advisory Board for the periodical of the Faculty of Arts, Sohag University, Egypt.

 

 

Postgraduate supervision

I welcome applications from research students interested in the fields of censorship, human rights and literature, contemporary literature, migrant writing, fiction and gender, trauma and literature, and identity and form. I am also happy to take on projects on Spanish cinema and the Spanish Civil War in film and literature. 

I have supervised or am currently supervising the following research projects:n

• With or Without Us: Cinematic Thinking and Cinematic Worlds

• Reading Trans: An Analysis of Post-1990s Trans Fiction

• Digesting "Creepypasta": An Analysis of Social Media Horror

• Rethinking Transcultural Relations in a Latin American Literary Context

• Overlayered Landscapes in Twenty-First Century Fiction of the American South

• All Hallows: A Study of Halloween Literature as a Sub-Genre of Horror

• Why are real-life British serial killers rarely represented on film?

• Abjection and the Body in Body-Horror Films

• Censoring Allegorical Texts: Interpreting Miller and Orwell'

• Print/Screen: How Contemporary Print Fiction Remediates Digital Writing

 

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