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Keith Davids

Professor Keith Davids BEd. PhD.

Professor

Summary

Professor Keith Davids is Professor of Motor Learning at the Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER), where he leads the Skill Acquisition theme. His research programme in ecological dynamics investigates constraints on coordination tendencies in athletes and sports teams classed as nonlinear dynamical systems. Ideas from ecological psychology and nonlinear dynamics have been integrated into a Nonlinear Pedagogy. His research seeks to investigate affordances as constraints on emergent coordination tendencies in athletes and sports teams. In addition to his research Keith supervises several UK based and international doctoral students. Keith is also a journal and grant reviewer for several national and international publishing companies and organisations, and contributes to the MSc Human Factors in Sports Engineering module.

  • About

    Professor Keith Davids is Professor of Motor Learning at the Centre for Sports Engineering Research. Keith graduated from the University of London and gained a PhD at the University of Leeds in Psychology and Physical Education. He has previously held Professorial positions in the UK (Manchester Metropolitan University), New Zealand (University of Otago), Australia (Queensland University of Technology) and Finland (Finnish Distinguished Professor at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland).  

    Keith's research programme investigates sport performance, skill acquisition and expertise enhancement in sport and how to design learning, training and practice environments to successfully achieve these outcomes. He specialises in ecological dynamics, a theoretical framework, combined of concepts from ecological psychology and dynamical systems theory. His research seeks to investigate affordances (opportunities for action) as constraints on emergent coordination tendencies in athletes and sports teams. These key ideas have been implemented in a Nonlinear Pedagogy which is informed by Keith's work on motor learning design in sport.  

    Keith collaborates on research in sport, physical activity and exercise with colleagues at universities in Spain, Portugal, France, Netherlands, Iran, Macedonia, New Zealand, Australia and Finland. A large proportion of his scientific and practical research has been undertaken in collaboration with the New Zealand South Island Sports Academy, the Queensland Academy of Sport, the Australian Institute of Sport, Diving Australia, Cricket Australia, GB Cycling and the English Institute of Sport.  

    In addition to his research, Keith has supervised doctoral students from UK, France, Finland, Portugal, Australia and New Zealand, and continues to supervise the research programmes of several practitioners working with UK-based high level sports organisations and international doctoral students. Keith is also a journal and grant reviewer for several national and international organisations, and contributes to the MSc Human Factors in Sports Engineering module.  

    Areas of interest:

    • Skill acquisition
    • Sporting expertise
    • Sport performance
    • Talent development
    • Practice design in sports like climbing, diving, football and cricket
    • Ecological dynamics



  • Teaching

    MSc Sports Engineering:

    • Human Factors in Sports Engineering
  • Research

    Research centre:

    • Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER)

    Research theme group:

    Current research projects:

    • The role of Parkour in enhancing athleticism in team games players
    • Decision making in team sports
    • Practice task design in individual and team sports
    • Use of compression and textured materials in enhancing somatosensory feedback in athletic performance

    Collaborators and sponsors:

    • Academics in universities in Finland, Portugal, Spain, France, Netherlands, Iran, Australia and New Zealand.
    • Professional sports organisations such as the English Institute of Sport, GB Cycling and the GB Paralympic Association.
  • Postgraduate supervision

    Current supervised PhD students:

    • Analysis of activity profiles of national and international soccer officials in Saudi Arabia.
    • Physical, psychological and emotional effects of nature-based affordances of green physical activity
    • Skill acquisition and decision making in small-sided football games.
    • Does performance expertise constrain pedagogical expertise in dance?
    • Effects of textured and compression materials in movement organisation during football kicking performance inter-muscular coordination tendencies in cycling.
    • The role of adaptive variability in individual and group multi-articular action systems

    Completed supervised PhD students:

      • Perceptual Skill in Soccer. Department of Movement Science and Physical Education, University of Liverpool, UK.
      • Exploring the Boundaries of the Specificity of Learning Hypothesis. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Bi-manual Coordination of the Upper Limbs: The Road from Manual Aiming to Two-Handed Catching. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Perception-action Coupling in Expert Table Tennis Players. Department of Sport Studies, University College Chichester, University of Southampton, UK.
      • Time-to-Contact Information in Interceptive Tasks. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • A Dynamical Systems Analysis of Interceptive Actions. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Could You Do It Again? Biomechanical Characteristics of Intra-Subject Variability in Basketball Shooting. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • The Effects of Anxiety on Movement Coordination. Centre for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, UK.
      • Effects of Visual Demonstrations on Motor Skill Acquisition: A Visual Perception Perspective. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Strategy and Practice for Acquiring Skilled Behaviour in Discrete, Self-Paced Interceptive Actions. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Body-Scaling, Affordances and Sensitivity to Moment of Inertia Information in Childrens; Racket Sports. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Constraints on skill acquisition: a meta-analysis of the movement based observational learning literature. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Constraints on interceptive actions in cricket. Division of Sport and Recreation, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand.
      • Abordagem ecoloacute;gica da dinacirc;mica da tomada de decisatilde;o no desporto: Estudos na Vela e no Basquetebol (An ecological approach to the dynamics of decision making in sport: experiments in sailing and basketball). Faculty of Human Kinetics, Lisbon Technical University, Portugal.
      • Postural Constraints on Catching. Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK.
      • Coordination changes in soccer kicking under different task constraints. School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand.
      • Movement coordination in a discrete multiarticular action from a dynamical systems perspective. School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand.
      • A dinâmica da aproximação no Rugby - Identificação de padrões de coordenação inter e intra-equipa (Dynamical decision making in Rugby - Identifying interpersonal coordination patterns). Faculty of Human Kinetics, Lisbon University of Technology, Portugal.
      • Ecological psychology and representative task design in the study of the penalty-kick in association football. School of Physical Education, University of Otago, NZ.
      • Expertise and its development in cricket fast bowlers. School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • A dinamica ecologica da tomada de decisiao no jogo de futsal (The ecological dynamics of decision-making in futsal). Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Lisbon University of Technology, Portugal.
      • Applications of dynamical systems theory and; analyses to cricket fast bowling. Centre for Sport and Exercise Science, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
      • Effects of enhanced somatosensory information on postural stability in older people and patients with Parkinson’s disease. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Informational constraints on attacker-defender performance in Futsal. Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.
      • Representative task design in cricket batting practice and skill acquisition in developing cricketers. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • An examination of learning design in elite springboard diving. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Identifying the function of movement variability. Centre for Sport and Exercise Science, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
      • Constraints on the acquisition of skill in controlling run ups in sport. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Identification of Skill Characteristics of Soccer Players in Agility Using Linear and Nonlinear Analysis of Movement Kinematic Variability. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Republic of Iran.
      • Emergent coordination patterns in interceptive actions: The role of different informational constraints. Centre for Sport and Exercise Science, Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
      • Contextualising Expertise Acquisition: Constraints on Performance Development in Brazilian Footballers School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand.
      • Shaping Tactical Behaviours in Football: An Ecological Dynamics Approach, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, Portugal.
      • The Effect of Emotion in Representative Learning Design and Nonlinear Learning. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Dynamique de l'apprentissage d'une habileté complexe sous diffeacute;rentes conditions d'apprentissage: cas de l'escalade rocheuse (Dynamics of learning a complex skill: The case of rock climbing). Faculteacute; des Sciences du Sport, Universiteacute; de Rouen, France and School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Acculturation and Professional Socialisation as Constraints on the adoption of Physical Education Pedagogy. School of Exercise and Nutrition Science, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
      • Analysis of activity profiles of national and international soccer officials in Saudi Arabia.

      Completed PhD examination:

      • MPhil Internal: 0
      • MPhil External: 0
      • PhD Internal: 3
      • PhD External: 34
    • Media

      Professor Keith Davids is Professor of Motor Learning at the Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER), where he leads the Skill Acquisition theme. His research programme in ecological dynamics investigates constraints on coordination tendencies in athletes and sports teams classed as nonlinear dynamical systems. Ideas from ecological psychology and nonlinear dynamics have been integrated into a Nonlinear Pedagogy. His research seeks to investigate affordances as constraints on emergent coordination tendencies in athletes and sports teams. In addition to his research Keith supervises several UK based and international doctoral students. Keith is also a journal and grant reviewer for several national and international publishing companies and organisations, and contributes to the MSc Human Factors in Sports Engineering module.

      The Centre for Sports Engineering Research (CSER) is led by Dr David James. It is the world's largest academic group in sports engineering and an internationally renowned centre of excellence for research and knowledge transfer. The centre's work is based on four research disciplines; applied computing, biomechanics, design engineering, and skill acquisition. In each area, researchers develop fundamental knowledge and deliver applied solutions to enhance athletic performance, reduce injury and promote physical activity.  

      CSER works in partnership with many sport, health and commercial organisations. We are immensely proud of our work with Team GB Olympic, and Paralympic athletes, and we enjoy research partnerships with global organisations such as the International Tennis Federation, FIFA, and Adidas.  

      Areas of expertise:

      • Skill Acquisition
      • Sporting Expertise
      • Sport Performance
      • Talent development
      • Practice design in sports like football and cricket
      • Ecological dynamics

      Notable media coverage:



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