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Publications

Reports

"The Good days are Amazing", An Evaluation of the Writers in Prison Network

Caroline O'Keeffe and Dr Katherine Albertson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

October 2012

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The Writers in Prison Network (WIPN) was established and appointed by the Arts Council in April 1998 to administer the Writers in Residence in Prison Scheme. The scheme places writers and creative artists into prisons across the UK to deliver creative writing, drama, video, music, oral storytelling, journalism, creative reading and publishing programmes.

The scheme employs writers who are experienced or established in particular literary fields; many have been creative writing tutors, or have worked in publishing, the theatre, television, radio or journalism. In administering the scheme, WIPN supports up to 20 Writers in Residence at any one time (with an average of 15–16 residencies per year and a maximum of 22 residencies per year undertaken during the lifetime of WIPN).

In 2010 the Hallam Centre for Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University was commissioned to undertake an evaluation of the Writers in Prison Network. The evaluation was primarily qualitative in approach which aimed to inform and support the future development of WIPN.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Intensive Alternatives to Custody Process evaluation of pilots in five areas

Kevin Wong, Caroline O'Keeffe, Dan Ellingworth and Professor Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

July 2012

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This evaluation assessed the implementation and development of the Intensive Alternatives to Custody (IAC) Pilot Programme in 2009/10 in Dyfed Powys, South Wales, West Yorkshire, Humberside and Merseyside.

The programme was funded centrally until March 2011. IAC orders targeted offenders at risk of short-term custody and represented a repackaging of existing and new requirements including intensive supervision, control/punishment, rehabilitation and compliance elements. At the time of the research, they were the latest iteration of community orders aimed at this group.

Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/process-evaluations-on-intensive-alternatives-to-custody

Process Evaluation of Derbyshire Intensive Alternatives to Custody Pilot

Kevin Wong, Caroline O'Keeffe, Dan Ellingworth, Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Linda Meadows, Joanna Davidson and Dr Hayden Bird, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

July 2012

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The aim of this study was to critically assess the implementation and development of the Intensive Alternatives to Custody (IAC) pilot in Derbyshire. The Ministry of Justice Penal Policy paper (May 2007) outlined the government's intention to develop higher intensity community orders as an alternative to short-term custody.

The IAC Order was subsequently developed and piloted, first in Derbyshire and then in six other areas.

The Derbyshire Intensive Alternatives to Custody pilot ran from 2008 to 2011 to test the use of intensive community orders to divert offenders from short-term custodial sentences. The pilot was delivered through dedicated Offender Managers (OMs) in Derby City, and through OMs with wider caseloads in rural Derbyshire county.

IAC orders targeted offenders at risk of short-term custody and represented a repackaging of existing and new requirements, which aimed to both punish and rehabilitate. The process evaluation of the Derbyshire IAC pilot was commissioned by the MoJ in December 2008.

Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/process-evaluation-of-integrated-offender-management-areas

Tackling Health Inequalities through Developing Evidence-based Policy and Practice with Childbearing Women in Prison: A Consultation

Dr Katherine Albertson, Caroline O'Keeffe, Georgina Lessing-Turner, Catherine Burke, Professor Mary J Renfrew, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

May 2012

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A collaborative partnership between the Hallam Centre for Community Justice and the Mother and Infant Research Unit (MIRU) at the University of York was successful in securing funding to conduct this consultation project.

This collaboration brought together the knowledge and expertise of researchers working in maternal and infant health and those with knowledge of the prison sector. This consultation scopes and maps the health needs and health care of childbearing women in prison, using the Yorkshire and Humberside region as a case study.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Evaluation of the South Yorkshire Restorative Justice Programme (SYRJP)

Linda Meadows, Katherine Albertson, Dan Ellingworth and Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

April 2012.

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The SYRJP was developed in partnership between South Yorkshire Police and the Local Criminal Justice Board (LCJB) with the aim of implementing a county wide model of Restorative Justice (RJ) for use in neighbourhood policing and other community applications.

It is aimed at tackling low level crime and anti-social behaviour in neighbourhoods and gives police officers the discretion to use Youth and Adult Restorative disposals as an alternative to prosecution for low level offending behaviour where offenders have no previous convictions, make an admission of guilt and where both offender and victim consent to the RJ process.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

The development and Year One Implementation of the Local Justice Reinvestment Pilot

Kevin Wong, Linda Meadows, Frank Warburton, Sarah Webb, Helen Young and Nicola Barraclough. Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University, May 2013.

May 2013.

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This report focuses on the initial findings from a process evaluation of the Local Justice Reinvestment pilot (commissioned by the Ministry of Justice), which examines the early development and implementation of the pilot in the first test year.

The pilot is one of the Ministry of Justice Payment by Results (PbR) schemes. The methodology was primarily qualitative and included: interviews with strategic and operational managers; interviews and focus groups with front line staff; workshops to map partnership and criminal justice system changes and a focus on exemplar interventions at three sites.

Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-development-and-year-one-implementation-of-the-local-justice-reinvestment-pilot

Increasing the voluntary and community sector's involvement in Integrated Offender Management (IOM)

Kevin Wong, Caroline O'Keeffe, Linda Meadows, Joanna Davidson, Hayden Bird, Katherine Wilkinson and Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

October 2011

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As part of an undertaking to increase voluntary and community sector (VCS) involvement in service delivery, the Home Office set up an initiative to provide small grants to VCS organisations to work with IOM partnerships.

The Home Office commissioned an evaluation of the initiative which aimed to: explore the strengths and weaknesses of the funding model; identify perceived barriers and facilitators to voluntary and community sector involvement in IOM; explore how the Home Office might best work with the VCS to encourage and support their capacity to work in partnership with statutory agencies; and identify any implications for the delivery of future similar projects.

Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/increasing-the-voluntary-and-community-sectors-involvement-in-integrated-offender-management

Process Evaluation of Five Integrated Offender Management Pioneer Areas

Professor Paul Senior, Kevin Wong, Alex Culshaw, Dan Ellingworth, Caroline O'Keeffe and Linda Meadows, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

May 2011

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At the time of the research, Integrated Offender Management (IOM) was the most developed attempt to operationalise the concept of end to end offender management. An IOM approach aimed to co-ordinate all relevant agencies to deliver interventions for offenders identified as warranting intensive engagement, whatever their statutory status.

At the core of IOM was the delivery of a managed set of interventions, sequenced and tailored to respond to the risks and needs of the individual. These interventions had the key aim of disrupting the offender's criminal activity and thereby reducing their re-offending. The Home Office (HO) and Ministry of Justice (MoJ) jointly issued guidance on how IOM could develop. However, definition of the approach was left to local discretion.

Government funding was provided to six pioneer sites in 2008/09 and five of these, Avon and Somerset, Lancashire, Nottinghamshire, West Midlands and West Yorkshire, became the object of this evaluation which was commissioned by the HO and MoJ in July 2009.

Link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/process-evaluation-of-integrated-offender-management-areas

An Evaluation of the Prison Radio Association's Activity, Year 3: The Way Forward

Dr Katherine Wilkinson and Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

April 2010

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The PRA developed a strategic three year activity plan (2007–2009) which has been evaluated annually by the Hallam Centre for Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University.

In 2009, key PRA objectives were to continue to provide prisons with support to set up their own radio projects, to host the Second Annual Conference and Awards Ceremony, to develop a National Prison Radio Service (NPRS) and to develop a sustainable funding strategy and press strategy.

The findings of the evaluation of these three activity areas are contained within the main body of this report.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Evaluation of Sheffield City Council's Community Justice Panels Project

Linda Meadows and Kerry Clamp, Alex Culshaw, Nichola Cadet, Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

March 2010.

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This report is the output of an evaluation commissioned by Sheffield City Council and undertaken by the Hallam Centre for Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University. The evaluation was undertaken during October and November 2009 with the objectives of assessing the effectiveness of the Community Justice Panels project so far and providing recommendations for future development.

The evaluation used an action research methodology and included documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews with strategic partners and stakeholders, wrongdoers and harmed persons, facilitator focus group and observation of the Panels.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Investigating the Prisoner Finance Gap across four prisons in the North East

Linda Meadows, Simon Feasey and Dr Hayden Bird with Joanna Davidson, Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Jane Woodford and Laura McCulloch, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

2010, ISBN 978 1 84712 895 9

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Within the underpinning context of reducing re-offending of released prisoners, the Prisoner Finance Gap (PFG) has been identified as an issue that is likely to present a significant barrier to the effective resettlement of offenders.

The Hallam Centre for Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University was therefore commissioned by the Department for Work and Pensions to conduct an investigation into the PFG within four prisons in the North East: Her Majesty's Prison HMP Durham, HMP Acklington, Her Majesty's Young Offenders Institution HMYOI Castington and HMP Low Newton.

The research was conducted between April 2009 and May 2010 and included a literature review, semi-structured interviews with strategic and policy stakeholders, staff from prison, probation, voluntary sector agencies and Jobcentre Plus, 51 prisoners and 21 ex-prisoners, and an online survey.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Ideas Project Evaluation, formerly known as Inside Innovation, Year Three

Dr Katherine Wilkinson and Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

December 2009

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In the first year of program delivery (January to December 2006), the Ideas Project operated in two prisons, HMP Downview and HMP Wandsworth. During year two of this program delivery (January to December 2007), Inside Innovation expanded to work in HMP Brixton and HMP Highdown. In the third and fourth year of project delivery (January 2008 to December 2009) the Ideas project has rolled out its service to 6 further prisons around London.

This report provides details of the projects successfully funded by UnLtd over the four years of the Ideas Project delivery, as well as evaluating the four-year pilot scheme as a whole.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Evaluation of the Content and Delivery of the Student Workbook for Royal Society for Public Health, Health Trainer Qualification, Level 2 Understanding Health Improvement for Health Trainer Champions in Prisons and the Wider Community

Dr Katherine Wilkinson with Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

August 2009

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The concept of Health Trainers (HT) being drawn from a given community is becoming well established and work has been on-going around this theme since 2005. At a national level the current focus of this work centres on the development of this model within the offender health context. In 2008 the North West and East Midlands Health Trainer Hubs, in partnership with Offender Health collaborated to produce an educational workbook based upon the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) training programme. The workbook was launched nationally in July 2008.

The Hallam Centre for Community Justice was commissioned to conduct consultancy work regarding the appropriateness of workbook content for trainers delivering and students attending the RSPH Health Trainers programme in prisons and the wider community. This research identified the models of course delivery around the country and identifies the impacts of the workbook and the wider health trainer programme on both the teaching and learning experience.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

An evaluation of the Sycamore Tree Programme – Based on an Analysis of Crime Pics II Data

Simon Feasey and Patrick Williams, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University and Manchester Metropolitan University

August 2009, ISBN - 978-1-84387-306-8

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Sheffield Hallam University, in conjunction with Manchester Metropolitan University, were commissioned to undertake an evaluation of the Sycamore Tree programme by Prison Fellowship England and Wales, who have been delivering the programme across a wide range of prisons throughout England and Wales over a number of years.

This current evaluation builds on a previous report published by Sheffield Hallam University in 2005 which undertook a similar analysis and identified a positive impact on prisoners who had successfully completed the programme.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Doncaster Desistance Study

Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

August 2009; ISBN 978-1-84387-305-1

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This study identifies the transition and sequencing of desistance from criminal activity of a sample of sentence serving offenders who were in custody at HMP Doncaster in 2006.

Twenty men who were interviewed twice regarding accessing the DoVeS counselling service were invited to take part in this project.

The research team successfully contacted and interviewed five ex-offenders who had been desisting from offending for up to three years.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/


An Evaluation of the Sheffield PPO Premium Service

Simon Feasey with Dr Hayden Bird, Joanna Davidson, Anne Robinson and Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

March 2009; ISBN - 978-1-84387-299-3

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The Hallam Centre for Community Justice (HCCJ) was commissioned to undertake an evaluation of the existing arrangements that underpin the Prolific and Priority Offenders (PPO) programme in the Sheffield district.

The final report includes details of the methodology used, the findings from interviews with PPOs, offender managers and key stakeholders, and recommendations for future development.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

The Resettlement of Offenders and Ex-Offenders in Doncaster: Developing an Integrated Framework

Simon Feasey and Paul Senior with Dr Hayden Bird, Linda Meadows, Joanna Davidson and Anne Robinson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

December 2008, ISBN - 978-1-84387-288-7

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The Hallam Centre for Community Justice (HCCJ) was commissioned by Doncaster Metropolitan Borough Council (DMBC), to undertake an evaluation of the existing processes and arrangements that underpin the delivery of services to offenders and ex-offenders within the district.

From this evaluation a needs and gap analysis was completed which informed the identification of a set of key proposals which underpin the development of an integrated framework for resettlement. A mixed methodology was used including stakeholder and offender interviews; focus groups and an on-line survey; quantitative analysis of case file material; desk top research and consultative workshops.

The final report includes the key findings from the completion of a Gap analysis of offender needs and proposes a set of critical success factors and key recommendations to support the development of an integrated framework for resettlement.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

'They've Been my Lifeline': An Evaluation of South Yorkshire's Specialist Domestic Violence Court Initiative: The Independent Domestic Violence Advocacy Service.

Dr Katherine Wilkinson and Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

August 2008. ISBN - 978-1-8438-7284-9

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This evaluation was designed to effectively conduct a 'mapping' exercise to establish the service delivery models of IDVAS services in Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield.

An important element of this work was to facilitate service user reflections on the IDVA Services in South Yorkshire.

This evaluation also contains criminal prosecution-based perspectives on the effectiveness of domestic violence focused initiatives in South Yorkshire. SDVC data is used to provide an overview analysis of discontinued, cracked, ineffective or vacated domestic violence cases, reflecting on discontinuance rates in South Yorkshire.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/


'Changing the Dynamic: An Evaluation of the South West Accommodation Gateway (SWAG)

Professor Paul Senior and Linda Meadows with Dr Hayden Bird, Joanna Davidson, Simon Feasey, Valerie Monti-Holland, Caroline O'Keeffe, Anne Robinson and Jaime Waters, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

July 2008. ISBN 978-1-84387-282-5

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This report is an evaluation of a pilot accommodation service for offenders run by NOMS (National Offender Management Service) South West. The pilot consists of three accommodation Gateways whose aim is to provide a co-ordinated accommodation service for offenders through a single referral point.

The aims of the evaluation, which commenced in May 2007 are to: review the implementation of the SWAG project to inform delivery and development of the project and any national roll-out, to explore the profile of offenders referred to the Gateways and the relationship between offenders who receive services from SWAG and improvements in their accommodation status.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

An Evaluation of the workbook for Health Trainers in Prisons and the Wider Community: based on the Royal Institute of Public Health Level 2 Award: Understanding Health Improvement

Dr Katherine Wilkinson, Linda Ball and Elaine Brookes, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

July 2008

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Health trainers form part of a public policy initiative designed to tackle health inequalities. Health Trainers were first proposed in the White Paper 'Choosing Health' (2004) and initially some 1200 NHS accredited Health Trainers were placed in post, providing support in key Primary Care Trust areas with the most challenging health and deprivation indicators.

The North West and East Midlands Health Trainer Hubs have developed initiative further within the Prison and National Probation Services with the production of a workbook to support prisoners in their attainment of the award. A team from Sheffield Hallam University were commissioned to conduct a brief consultation exercise to ensure that prison staff delivering the initiative, and prisoners who have completed the training in custody were given the opportunity to contribute to the design and content of the workbook.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

The Answers are Within Me: An evaluation of a person centred counselling service for men at HMP Doncaster who have had experience of domestic violence 2005–2007

Paula Hamilton, Dr Katherine Wilkinson and Linda Meadows with Nicola Cadet, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

March 2008. ISBN 1-84387-272-2

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This report is the second year evaluation of the person centred counselling service for male victims and perpetrators of domestic violence at HMP Doncaster in 2006/7. It follows on from the previous year's evaluation, Raging Anger Within Me, which evaluated this project in 2005/6. Initiated by the Doncaster Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre (DRSACC), the second year of counselling service delivery was also funded by Lloyds TSB and the Tudor Trust.

The report provides a background to the service offered, details the key factors in the service's success and makes recommendations for the future sustainability of this innovative service. The report also contains a particularly interesting section detailing how the appropriateness of the service is perceived by experienced prison staff.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Inside Innovation: An evaluation of the second year of delivery of a project promoting innovative thinking amongst Prison Service staff Inside Innovation Evaluation, Year Two

Dr Katherine Wilkinson with Joanna Davidson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

December 2007

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The Inside Innovation programme is the result of a partnership between Media For Development (MFD) and UnLtd. The Inside Innovation programme forms part of MFD's multi-award winning Inside Job initiative that operates within the criminal justice system in the United Kingdom.

MFD staff are responsible for supporting applications to UnLtd for funded awards for good project ideas generated from staff working in the prison sector. In line with equivalent posts at UnLtd, the Development Manager supports Award Winners throughout the lifespan of their projects.

During the first year of service delivery, Inside Innovation operated in two prisons, HMP Wandsworth and HMP Downview. During the second year of service delivery, Inside Innovation has been established in two further prisons, HMP Brixton and HMP Highdown.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Offenders and E-Learning – A Literature Review on behalf of Becta

Caroline O'Keeffe, Joanna Davidson, Linda Meadows, Professor Paul Senior and Professor Noel Williams, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

October 2007

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This literature review has been prepared by the Hallam Centre of Community Justice at Sheffield Hallam University, on behalf of Becta. The literature review provides a summary of existing research and knowledge relating to e-learning in the offending learning sector with a view to developing a range of e-maturity indicators across the sector. The review also highlights linkages with current Government policy in relation to offender learning and skills.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

The DAWN Project Evaluation 2007

Professor Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University, and Professor Julian Buchanan, Sally Baker and Martin Evans, Social Inclusion Research Unit, University of Wales, NEWI

August 2007. ISBN 1-84387-258-7

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The DAWN Project is an umbrella organisation that brings agencies together across North Wales and beyond to develop joined up services that are supported by satellite venues from existing partnership facilities.

This paper provides a full evaluation of the project, and details the methodology behind the evaluation.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

From Morality to Rights: Debating Sex Work and Sexual Exploitation

The Symposium on Women, Human Rights and Prostitution, July 2007 Anne Robinson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

July 2007

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The report of the Symposium on Women, Human Rights and Prostitution is published at a timely point in the autumn of 2007 as new legislation around soliciting offences is being considered and with much public attention on sex trafficking.

Between September 2006 and June 2007, the Symposium brought together a wide range of stakeholders from the prostitution field, including European partners, with a view to changing the terms of the often divisive and polarised prostitution debate and to test out the potential for finding consensus about constructive ways forward.

The Symposium held five meetings focused on different relevant topics and the final report summarises the conclusions of debates across the series of seminars.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Raging Anger Within Me

Dr Katherine Wilkinson and Caroline O'Keeffe, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

June 2007. ISBN 1-84387-257-9

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This evaluation of the person centred counselling service for male victims and perpetrators of domestic violence was conducted at HMP Doncaster in 2005/6, It was initiated by the Doncaster Rape and Sexual Abuse Counselling Centre (DRSACC), a member of the Doncaster Domestic Violence Working Party (DDVWP), and funded by Lloyds TSB and the Tudor Trust.

The report provides a background to the service offered, details the methodologies employed in the conducting of the research, and makes recommendations for the future development of the service.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

The Wakefield District Prolific and Priority Offender Needs Analysis and Business Case

Simon Feasey, Hayden Bird, Linda Meadows, Anne Robinson and Professor Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

March 2007

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The Hallam Centre for Community Justice was commissioned by the Wakefield District Community Safety Partnership (WDCSP) to undertake a needs analysis of the Wakefield Prolific and Priority Offender Scheme(Rehabilitate and Resettle) and to develop a business case incorporating proposals and make recommendations with regard to the future management and delivery of the scheme.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

A Visible Difference: an Evaluation of the Second Phase of Police Community Support Officers in West Yorkshire

Dr Matthew Long andAnne Robinson with Professor Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

September 2006. ISBN 1-84387-240-4

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This evaluation was commissioned by West Yorkshire Police in 2004 to review the second phase of PCSO deployment in the West Yorkshire force.

The report – including a foreword by the then Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police, the late Colin Cramphorn - details the research undertaken in this evaluation and links to the evaluation undertaken of the first phase of PCSO deployment in West Yorkshire.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

"I Ain't No Tea Lady": Identifying and addressing barriers to non-traditional employment, training and education from a female perspective, SOVA

Caroline O'Keeffe and Dr Katherine Wilkinson with Amy Christian, Kay Nixon, Anne Robinson and Professor Paul Senior, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

August 2006; ISBN 1 84387 178 5.

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The aim of this research was to examine perceptions and experiences of accessing non-traditional Education Training and Employment (ETE) from the vantage point of disadvantaged women using innovative sampling and research techniques. The research design and strategy sought to access the participant's views and valuable experience. Many of the women whose opinions the research was trying to elicit had never considered non-traditional ETE, in their own words it simply was 'not on their radar'. We decided to adopt a 'workshop' approach. A workshop format was designed which used fun and thought provoking exercises to promote discussion. These interactive and dynamic workshops proved successful in generating some excellent data. In total 80 women from a range of areas of disadvantage participated in the research.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Enhancing the Role of the Voluntary and Community Sector - A Case Study of the Yorkshire and Humber Region

Professor Paul Senior, with Linda Meadows, Simon Feasey and Janet Atkinson, Hallam Centre for Community Justice, Sheffield Hallam University

November 2004

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This report was commissioned by the Chief Executive of the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) to evaluate at ground level, using the Yorkshire and Humberside region as a case study, what is currently being achieved by the Prison and Probation Services in working with the Voluntary and Community Sector (VCS); and to identify and provide analysis of perceived barriers and make recommendations to improve the engagement of the sector.

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/

Pathways to Resettlement: Regional Framework for Yorkshire and the Humber 2003-2006

June 2003

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The Yorkshire and the Humber Regional Resettlement Framework - Pathways to Resettlement is an important piece of work bringing together statutory and voluntary agencies across the region in a model of joined-up practice which builds on the national agenda developed in the Social Exclusion Unit Report 'Reducing Re-Offending by ex-prisoners'.

Download executive summary (PDF 1MB)

Link: http://www.cjp.org.uk/publications/academic/
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