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Professor Khaled Khatab BSc, MSc, PhD, CStat, CSci RSS

Professor of Statistics and Health Economic modelling

Summary

Khaled is a Professor of Statistics and Health Economic Modelling. Khaled has joined Sheffield Hallam University (SHU) in September 2012, initially as a Principal Research Fellow and prompted to a Reader (equivalent to Associate Professor) in 2017 and to a Personal Chair in  2020.

Due to the seniority of his current post, Khaled performs many duties and roles such as leading on and contributing to multidisciplinary research teams as well as leading on the statistics and health economic components of funded research projects and bids.



  • About

    Since March 2015, Khaled has taken over Professor Malcolm Whitfield's research project commitments, including leading PhD research projects as well as his major statistical modelling project. This includes his Health Economics leadership role, working across diverse disciplines within the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing.

    Khaled currently leads statistical modelling in various projects, undertaking methodological and applied research and consultancy, using mathematical and statistical techniques in health and healthcare.

    For the past 17 years, Khaled's main research interests have been in Bayesian statistical methods and their application to epidemiology and health, in particular, addressing maternal and child health and a variety of health-related inequalities, both in developing countries and command economies, using large-scale household data. During these years Khaled has developed a portfolio of research in the burden of disease domain and utilising data at various spatial resolutions/scales for best policy guidance (i.e. global, national and international levels). This form of research has been developed in combination with a wide range of international and local scientists and their respective research institutions. Khaled's research has employed advanced Bayesian and spatial methods to identify high-risk areas for disease burden/mortality and associated highly attributable determinants to help improve resource allocation, as well as developing more specific personalised/targeted interventions.

    This work has resulted in at least hundreds of publications in internationally prestigious recognised journals, and of these, he has led over forty papers. Khaled's current income from research and consultancy-related projects stands at over £6 million (£1.8 million at SHU). These research projects and the highest impact articles have allowed me to extend his network, to be invited as a key speaker for international conferences, and to be a visiting professor at Ohio University, and visiting professor of Bayesian Statistics at the University of Washington, United States (US). Furthermore, Khaled is on the editorial board of highly regarded scientific journals such as PLOS ONE, and the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. This has endorsed him to work with a broad network of researchers, statisticians, and policymakers, following a science-based, collaborative approach.

    In 2019, Khaled became visiting Professor of Bayesian statistics at the University of Washington, US.

    In 2019, Khaled became Editor of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health for Child Health and Health Care. Khaled leads on Special Issue "Child Health and Effective Health Care in Low-and Middle-income Countries" https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph/special_issues/child_health_effective_health_care_low-and_middle-income_countries 

    Since early 2017, Khaled is Chair and of the Child Health and Epidemiology Group and line manager to the members of the Group. This theme aims to develop and deploy new and improved evidence on the causes and determinants of neonatal and child & maternal morbidity and mortality, on intervention handling and on the effectiveness of interventions to enlighten and impact the research priorities in this area both nationally and internationally. This includes estimating the specific distribution of the leading causes of under-5 deaths, as well as maternal mortality and of the proportion of these deaths which can be prevented and lives saved through developing precise interventions and enhancing modelling methodology along with new predictions of efficacy and effectiveness of child survival interventions.

    From 2015-2017, Khaled was Chair of the Research Methodology Team. This Research Team aims to promote research design, methodologies and statistical modelling in the University. To support the science of quality in all of our projects, the Centre invested in a Research Methods Group. The Group ensures that all research projects, bids and contracts are driven by clear conceptual frameworks, consisting of problem definitions, literature review, hypothesis, research questions, recruitment procedure, data collections, statistical methods and health economic modelling. They are implemented with well-documented research designs and methods, using appropriate statistical analysis.

    Khaled has been appointed as a Visiting Professor in Statistics by the University of Ohio Zanesville, the USA for 2016-2018. During this period, he has been working on a joint project with Ohio to assess the efficiency and effectiveness of herbal vs orthodox medicines in the USA publication: 'A case study for Campus students from different age groups'. Also, he taught the MATH 2500 (Statistics) course during the spring semester of 2017.

    In early 2017, Khaled became an Academic Editor for PLOS ONE Journal.

    Khaled was recently nominated as an inspirational research supervisor, which is a significant achievement and is testament to the quality of his professional practice. It reflects well on his professionalism and his support to the PhD students.

    Khaled has over 17 years' professional and/or post-doctoral experience in medical statistics and health economic modelling applied to epidemiology, social care, and public health. Over this period, in his role as Principal Investigator or Co-Investigator, he has secured over £6 (£1.8 million at SHU since 2012) million of research and consultancy grants for different institutions and published over hundreds of articles) (40 as the first author), with an average impact factor of 4 across all publications in high-impact internationally peer-reviewed journals such as the American Journal of Tropical Medicine, PLOS ONE and Nature (at least eight articles were considered in REF 2014 and REF 2021).  

    During the period 2016-2019, Khaled was able to develop a few novel models. He developed a few novel models. He assessed the area-specific spatial effects and risk factors of co-morbidity in children under five years old using a Bayesian multinomial geoadditive model (published in PLOS ONE in 2017). In 2019, some other novel papers were published/or accepted to be published in collaboration with the University of Washington. These few joint articles focus on global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV; global, regional, and national cancer incidence, mortality, years of life lost; and the global burden of type 2 diabetes, mapping 123 million neonatal, infant and neonatal, and child deaths for 195 countries around the world. These articles have been accepted and published in The Lancet HIVJAMA OncologyThe Lancet Planetary, and Nature journals, respectively, in 2019. 

    Khaled's main research interests are in Bayesian statistical methods and their application to epidemiology and health, in particular, addressing maternal and child health and a variety of health-related health inequalities, both in the developing countries and command economies, using large scale household data. This includes Bayesian modelling and diseases mapping, statistical methods applied to epidemiology, survival analysis, longitudinal data analysis, meta-analysis and Bayesian spatial Analysis. 

    • In Khaled previous roles, he worked as an Assistant Professor in Medical Statistics and Statistical Methods in Epidemiology for the RWTH Aachen University in Germany. In this capacity, he led the Epidemiology and Public Health Scheme at the Medical School of Aachen for five years from 2008 to 2012. His primary role was to direct and contribute to the output of multidisciplinary research teams (which comprised medical doctors, statisticians, a data manager, a sociologist and various research assistants). Khaled led the statistics and health economic components of funded research projects and bids. Another of Khaled's principal duties was to mentor, advise and train junior researchers to improve their skills and adjust their strategies to meet essential criteria, thereby conforming to the overall strategy of the University. As Principal Investigator (PI), he led several projects, collaborating with Aachen University, Warwick University, and Stockholm University. Data from these projects have been published in several prestigious international journals.
    • Khaled worked as a statistical consultant at Glasgow University from 2007 to 2008 and participated in a project funded by Glasgow City Council and the Scottish Government. The aim of this project was primarily to evaluate the impact of the provision of new social housing on physical and mental health. It focused on a longitudinal assessment of the health-related effects of significant housing improvements across Scotland. There was no marked change in physical health outcomes for people who were rehoused, nor was there any significant change in health-related behaviours.
    • From 2000 to 2008, Khaled worked as a researcher (and later as a senior researcher) in the Institute of Statistics at Munich University, where he gained both his MSc and PhD qualifications. During this period, Khaled taught statistics and supervised undergraduate and postgraduate students while developing modules and teaching materials.
    • Khaled also served as PI and participated (COI) in various projects which focused upon maternal and child health in developing countries in collaboration with Heidelberg University.
    • Khaled has been developing and applying modelling in support of healthcare decision-making, nationally and internationally, across an extensive range of diseases, interventions and service planning and policy issues, over the past 17 years. He has delivered many projects over a diverse range of research studies, including maternal and child health, CVD disease in the UK and abroad, dementia patients in the UK and abroad, public health problems in Europe and developing countries and cancer projects. This experience has led him to become a consultant for statistics and quantitative methods at the Royal Statistical Society in London.


  • Teaching

    Department of Nursing and Midwifery

    Health And Wellbeing

    Statistics III (Bayesian Inference, Multivariate Analysis, Probability Analysis, Regression Analysis)
    Statistics I and II (introductory courses in statistics)
    Medical Statistics
    Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

  • Research

    Khaled has been developing and applying models to support healthcare decision-making nationally and internationally across a broad range of diseases, interventions, and service planning and policy issues over the past 17 years. Khaled has delivered many projects over a diverse range of research studies, including maternal and child health, cardiovascular disease (CVD) disease in the United Kingdom (UK) and abroad, dementia patients in the UK and abroad, public health problems in Europe and developing countries, and cancer projects. This experience has led to me becoming a consultant for statistics and quantitative methods at the Royal Statistical Society in London.

    Khaled has over 17 years' professional and/or post-doctoral experience in Medical Statistics and Health Economic modelling applied to epidemiology, social care, and public health over this period. In Khaled's role as PI or co-investigator, He has secured over £6 million (£1.8 million at SHU since 2012) of research and consultancy grants for different institutions.

     Contribution to the development of the field of statistics: He developed an advanced statistical technique utilising highly sophisticated models to enable to accommodate a large number of variables, such as categorical, metrical, binary, spatial, and numerous types of outcome variables. Khaled developed and used the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) package in R software and a C++ code compiler system to develop this model, which has since been used widely. The outputs of this model system were published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine.

    January 2019. As a CoPI, Khaled secured SHU\HWB Creating Knowledge Fund for the Child Health and Epidemiology team to promote the African Projects.

    2018-2021: Khaled has had significant grant applications approved and funded. One of these applications, including research funding totalling £533,432, was submitted to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) 10th call for intervention (i4i), focusing on the Product Development Awards and Challenge Awards, and virtual reality (VR) prosthetics experiential system using Rift. This proposal builds on our previous VR pilot study with seven amputee patients. 

    The project involves a large team derived from SHU, the Northern General Hospital, and Sheffield teaching hospitals that are part of the NHS Foundation Trust. Khaled leads the research methodology and statistical and health economic modelling in this project.

    January 2018: As a PI, Khaled secured a SHU\HWB grant from the Strategic Research Investment Fund for the Child Health and Epidemiology team. This grant aimed to organise a seminar focusing on geospatial child health and epidemiology to explore the main concepts, gaps, methods, and research findings relating to infants and young children – five years and under and over – from a variety of perspectives, including psychology, education, and health, and including approaches to assessment and intervention.

    This seminar took place at the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing at SHU on 20th June 2018. 

    The main themes discussed at the seminar were child morbidity and mortality, child and adolescent mental health, interventions and evidence, and child labour and environmental influence to identify the social policies and programmes those are most effective in supporting Africa’s poorest and most vulnerable children.

    The focus of this Strategic Research fund included the seminar and the collaboration with different institutions (e.g. Wellcome Trust, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, University of Oxford, and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London), which aligns well with the University strategy as it builds on existing partnerships, further developing and creating a broad set of strategic research collaborations with other institutions and other universities in the UK and internationally to maintain and enhance our research excellence and reputation.

    From 2018 to 2020, another grant application has been funded by Dunhill Trust (£85,000) to evaluate the prevalence of thermal comfort/thermal discomfort perception self-report, body temperature, and skin thermal imaging maps in residents with/without mild cognitive impairment. Khaled is leading the statistical analysis in this project to assess the differences between self-report scales and the actual body temperatures for people with/without mild cognitive impairment.

    2016-2019: As a co-PI, Khaled developed the main concept for addressing missing values in MINAP data (The Myocardial Ischaemia National Audit Project). This project analysed routinely collected data for over 32,000 patients over three years (between 2010 and 2017) from the MINAP database and provided information vital to the development and evaluation of interventions aimed at reducing patient delay in contacting the emergency services following symptoms of Acute Coronary Syndrome. As a co-PI, Khaled leads statistical analysis that seeks to model the missing values in MINAP using multiple imputations with multilevel models to improve the efficiency of inferences and to enhance the utility of these data. A multidisciplinary research team is involved in this project, which originates from SHU, the University of Surrey, and the MINAP project manager. This grant was funded by the NIHR between 2014 and 2017 (£84,460).

    Previous Projects

    With a colleague, Khaled applied to Parkinson's Research UK for funding to assess the economic and social cost of Parkinson's on patients, carers, and their families. This project was successful and secured a total funding of £45,000. Khaled role in this project was to lead the health economic evaluation bid in collaboration with Professor Malcolm Whitfield. Since March 2015, Khaled has also assumed Professor Whitfield’s role. The health economic evaluation aims to assess the economic burden of Parkinson's disease in the UK. 

    The objective was to probe and investigate various cost dimensions, including treatment costs borne by the Government; direct and indirect medical costs to the patient; social care costs are borne by local government; paid/unpaid carer costs to the patient and their family; and societal costs (in terms of productivity loss caused by the inability of patients and family carers to attend work).

    Another project, 'A Tender for Models of Excellence Literature Reviews: Physical Activity (PA) in People with MS', was funded with £10,000 from the MS Society in June 2015. Khaled led the health economic bid, which aimed to review the economic and clinical effectiveness of PA delivery modelsA multidisciplinary research team from Health and Social Care Research and the Centre for Sport and Exercise Science (CSES) was involved in this project from SHU. The findings of this project were published. The results identified an association between increased PA and improved mental health in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

    In November 2015, another grant application was awarded £10,000 funding by the Doncaster Royal Infirmary (DRI). The overall aim of this project was to evaluate the 'Back Active' and 'Be Active' programmes of care and to prepare for an NIHR RfPB funding application in December 2015. One of the specific objectives was to identify limitations in the current evaluation strategy, such as the robustness and adequacy of outcome measurements, cost-effectiveness evaluation, and long-term data collection. This project led to recommendations for improving the assessment of the programme appropriate to a future cost-effectiveness research study. A health economics analysis examined the efficiency, costs, benefits and value for money in terms of improvement in the quality of life, estimated through quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) saved and decreasing disability levels as a result of being involved in the study. Effectiveness evaluation of this model was undertaken to assess the effect on other areas of care, including social care.

    Another grant application, including research funding totalling £70,000, was awarded by the NHS Foundation Trust. Khaled led the statistical modelling in this project, which was designed to evaluate the Sheffield primary care programme.

    In December 2015, another grant application was funded by Middlesbrough Council (£120,000) to review health development service provisions. His role in this project was to lead the health economic reviews.

    In February 2016, one of Khaled's grant applications was funded by the Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Foundation Trust – £69,000 funded the evaluation of the Adult Mental Health Hospital Liaison Service. Khaled led the statistical analysis in this project, which was designed to combine a retrospective matched control analysis with a series of targeted interviews of the project leads, hospital staff, and patients and their families.

    Between 2007 and 2013, Khaled led (PI) a lung-related diseases project (€1.9 million) funded by one of the critical occupational healthcare bodies in Germany. In this project, we examined the risk factors for developing lung cancer, using cohort data from around 20,000 participants who had been exposed to asbestos for many years. Khaled's role in this particular project was to lead the statistical and health economic analysis and to oversee the whole project, managing a multidisciplinary research team from the universities of Aachen, Munich, and Warwick.   

    A related funded project (€2.5 million) aimed to assess workplace exposure for different industrial groups (power generation, gas, etc.) and conducted clinical examinations of these groups using x-rays, CT scans, and other techniques. Khaled led the statistical and health economic modelling bid in this project in collaboration with Aachen University. The German Social Accident Insurance Institution funded this project

    The findings of this project were published in a prestigious journal in the occupational health field in Germany (2010), conference papers, and in internal reports in Germany.

    In 2010, Khaled submitted a grant application to the RWTH Aachen University in collaboration with statisticians and health economists from all over the world (€50,000). Khaled was the project leader (PI) for this research. One of the outcomes for this project was an International Epidemiology Workshop on Occupational and Public Health, which was held in Aachen University in 2010, and which Khaled chaired. Another outcome of this project was a book focusing on maternal and child health in developing countries. This book was published in spring 2013, entitled Advanced Techniques for Modelling Maternal and Child Health in Africa.

    Another example of generating income and work with numerous partners is Khaled's collaboration in leadership in research into childhood diseases in developing countries, funded by DFS (Deutsch Forschungsgemeinschaft Sonderforschungsbereich) in Germany. This was a three-year project (2006-2009) with a total fund of €100,560. The focus of this project was to investigate the risk factors associated with maternal and child health issues in developing countries. He led (PI) this project and took on project management duties, including managing a team of three researchers and two research assistants. The findings of this project were published in one of the high-impact journals on tropical medicine. Khaled developed (Munich University) geoadditive latent variable models, taking coughs, fevers and diarrhoea as well as stunting and malnutrition as observable indicators for the latent variables of morbidity and mortality

     This model was tested and approved (2006) by the Institute of Statistics, Munich University, and has since been used widely.



    Munich University, Aachen University, Qatar University and Qatar foundation, Ohio University, Cape town University, Sheffield University, University of Michigan, NIHR, MS society, DRI, CCG

  • Publications

    Key Publications

    Wiens, K., Reiner, B., A Lindstedt, P., Khatab, K., & Iain Hay, S. (2020). Mapping geographic inequalities in oral rehydration therapy coverage in low- and middle-income countries, 2000–17. The Lancet Global Health, 8 (8), e1038-e1060. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30230-8

    Reiner Jr, R.C., E Wiens, K., Khatab, K., Deshpande,, A., & Hay I, S. (2020). Mapping geographical inequalities in childhood diarrhoeal morbidity and mortality in low-income and middle-income countries, 2000–17: analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2017. The Lancet. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30114-8

    Kinyoki, D.K., Ross, J.M., Lazarr-Atwood, A., Khatab, K., Afshin, A., & Hay, S.I. (2020). Mapping local patterns of childhood overweight and wasting in low- and middle-income countries between 2000 and 2017. Nature Medicine, 26 (5), 750-759. http://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0807-6

    Inthavong, R., Khatab, K., Whitfield, M., Collins, K., Ismail, M., & Raheem, M. (2020). The Impact of Risk Factors Reduction Scenarios on Hospital Admissions, Disability-Adjusted Life Years and the Hospitalisation Cost of Cardiovascular Disease in Thailand. Open Access Library Journal, 07 (03), 1-21. http://doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1106160

    Burstein, R., Henry, N.J., Collison, M.L., Marczak, L.B., Sligar, A., Watson, S., ... Hay, S.I. (2019). Mapping 123 million neonatal, infant and child deaths between 2000 and 2017. Nature, 574 (7778), 353-358. http://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1545-0

    Frank, T.D., Carter, A., Jahagirdar, D., Biehl, M.H., Douwes-Schultz, D., Larson, S.L., ... Murray, C.J.L. (2019). Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and mortality of HIV, 1980–2017, and forecasts to 2030, for 195 countries and territories: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2017. The Lancet HIV. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3018(19)30196-1

    Khatab, K., Raheem, M.A., Sartorius, B., & Ismail, M. (2019). Prevalence and risk factors for child labour and violence against children in Egypt using Bayesian geospatial modelling with multiple imputation. PLOS ONE, 14 (5), e0212715. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0212715

    IInthawong, R., Khatab, K., Whitfield, M., Collins, K., Raheem, M., & Ismail, M. (2019). Health care and hospitalisation costs of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Thailand. Open Access Library Journal, 6 (3), e5320. http://doi.org/10.4236/oalib.1105320

    Khatab, K., Inthawong, R., Whitfield, M., Collins, K., Raheem, M.A., & Ismail, M. (2019). Application of Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk assessment equations to the Thai population. Biostatistics and Epidemiology International Journal. http://ologyjournals.com/beij/

    Khatab, K., Inthawong, R., Whitfield, M., Collins, K., Raheem, M., & Ismail, M. (2019). Risk factors associated with Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) in Thailand from the 4th National Health Examination Survey 2008-2009. Biostatistics and Epidemiology International Journal. http://ologyjournals.com/beij/

    Koh, S.C.L., Ibn-Mohammed, T., Acquaye, A., Feng, K., Reaney, I.M., Hubacek, K., ... Khatab, K. (2016). Drivers of U.S. toxicological footprints trajectory 1998–2013. Scientific Reports, 6, 39514. http://doi.org/10.1038/srep39514

    Khatab, K., Adegboye, O., & Mohammed, T.I. (2016). Social and demographic factors associated with morbidities in young children in Egypt: a Bayesian geo-additive semi-parametric multinomial model. PLOS ONE, 11 (7), e0159173. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0159173

    Khatab, K., Felten, M.K., Kandala, N.B., Ghilagaber, G., Gumber, A., & Kraus, T. (2014). Risk factors associated with asbestos-related diseases: results of the asbestos surveillance programme Aachen. European Medical Journal: respiratory, 1. http://emjreviews.com/

    Felten, M.K., Khatab, K., Knoll, L., Schettgen, T., Müller-Berndorff, H., & Kraus, T. (2014). Changes of mesothelin and osteopontin levels over time in formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 87 (2), 195-204. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00420-013-0853-1

    Khatab, K. (2012). The Arab Spring: Where is Egypt now? Significance, 9 (1), 32-34. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-9713.2012.00543.x

    Khatab, K., & Kandala, N.-.B. (2011). Latent variable modelling of risk factors associated with childhood diseases: Case study for Nigeria. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Disease, 1 (3), 169-176. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2222-1808(11)60022-4

    Felten, M.K., Knoll, L., Eisenhawer, C., Ackermann, D., Khatab, K., Hüdepohl, J., ... Kraus, T. (2010). Retrospective exposure assessment to airborne asbestos among power industry workers. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 5 (1), 15. http://doi.org/10.1186/1745-6673-5-15

    Khatab, K. (2010). Childhood malnutrition in Egypt using geoadditive gaussian and latent variable models. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 82 (4), 653-663. http://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2010.09-0501

    Khatab, K., & Fahrmeir, L. (2009). Analysis of childhood morbidity with geoadditive probit and latent variable model: a case study for Egypt. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 81 (1), 116-128. http://www.ajtmh.org/content/81/1/116.full.pdf+html

    Khatab, K. (n.d.). Egypt moving towards the unknown. Signifcance.

    Khatab, K. (n.d.). Associations Between Nutritional Indicators Using Geoadditive Latent Variable Models with Application to Child Malnutrition in Nigeria. Tropical Medicine and International Health.

    Journal articles

    L Murray, C., Y Aravkin, A., Zheng, P., Khatab, K., Cristiana, A., Ashkan, A., & Stephen, S.L. (2020). Global burden of 87 risk factors in 204 countries and territories, 1990–2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet, 396 (10258), 17-23. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30752-2

    Haidong, W., M Abbas, K., Abbasifard, M., Khatab, K., Ziapour, A., & J L Murray, C. (2020). Global age-sex-specific fertility, mortality, healthy life expectancy (HALE), and population estimates in 204 countries and territories, 1950–2019: a comprehensive demographic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet, 396 (10258), 1135-1159. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30977-6

    Murray, C.J.L., Abbafati, C., Abbas, K.M., Abbasi, M., Khatab, K., Vos, T., & Lim, S.S. (2020). Five insights from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet, 396 (10258), 1135-1159. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)31404-5

    Vos, T., S Lim, S., Abbafati, C., M Abbas, K., Khatab, K., Naghavi, M., & J L Murray, C. (2020). Global burden of 369 diseases and injuries in 204 countries and territories, 1990–2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet, 396, 1204-1222. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30925-9

    Childs, C., Elliott, J., Khatab, K., Hampshaw, S., Fowler-Davis, S., Willmott, J.R., & Ali, A. (2020). Thermal Sensation in Older People with and without Dementia Living in Residential Care: New Assessment Approaches to Thermal Comfort Using Infrared Thermography. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health — Open Access Journal, 17 (18), e6932. http://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186932

    Lusambili, A., Naanyu, V., Manda, G., Mossman, L., & Temmerman, M. (2020). Nutritional Influences on the Health of Women and Children in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

    Lozano, R., Fullman, N., Everett Mumford, J., Khatab, K., & J. L. Murray, C. (2020). Measuring universal health coverage based on an index of effective coverage of health services in 204 countries and territories, 1990–2019: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019. The Lancet. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)30750-9

    Deshpande, A., Miller-Petrie, M.K., Lindstedt, P.A., Khatab, K., Hay, S.I., & Reiner Jr, R.C. (2020). The global distribution of lymphatic filariasis, 2000–2018: a geospatial analysis. The Lancet Global Health, 8 (9), e1186-e1194. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30286-2

    Deshpande, A., Miller-Petrie, M.K., Lindstedt, P.A., Khatab, K., Hay, S.I., & Reiner Jr, R.C. (2020). Mapping geographic inequalities in access to drinking water and sanitation facilities in low- and middle-income countries, 2000–2017. The Lancet Global Health, 8 (9), e1162-e1185. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(20)30278-3

    (2020). Mapping local patterns of childhood overweight and wasting in low- and middle-income countries between 2000 and 2017. Nature Medicine. http://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0807-6

    Khatab, K., Inthavong, R., Whitfield, M., Collins, K., Ismail, M., & Raheem, M. (2020). The Impact of Risk Factors Reduction Scenarios on Hospital Admissions, Disability-Adjusted Life Years and the Hospitalisation Cost of Cardiovascular Disease in Thailand. Preprints. http://doi.org/10.20944/preprints202001.0162.v1

    Fitzmaurice, C., Abate, D., Abbasi, N., Abbastabar, H., Abd-Allah, F., Abdel-Rahman, O., ... Murray, C.J.L. (2019). Global, regional, and national cancer incidence, mortality, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years for 29 cancer groups, 1990 to 2017. JAMA Oncology. http://doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2019.2996

    Khatab, K., Raheem, M., Sartorius, B., & Ismail, M. (2019). Prevalence and Risk Factors for Child Labour and Violence against Child in Egypt using Bayesian Geospatial Modelling with Multiple Imputation. . http://doi.org/10.1101/546697

    Thongchundee, O., Gumber, A., Khatab, K., & Gumber, L. (2015). Efficacy and cost of atypical antipsychotics in treatment and management of dementia. SM Journal of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, 1 (1). http://smjournals.com/neurological-disorders-stroke/fulltext/smjnds-v1-1002.pdf

    Khatab, K., Felten, M., Kandala, N.-.B., Ghilagaber, G., & Kraus, T. (2011). Risk factors associated with asbestos-related lung diseases among different sub-cohorts of formerly asbestos exposed workers in Germany. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 68 (Suppl_1), A71. http://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100382.231

    Ludwig, F., & Khatab, K. (n.d.). Geoadditive Latent Variable Modelling of Child Morbidity and Malnutrition in Nigeria. Munich University, TR.

    Khatab, K., & Fahrmeir, L. (n.d.). Geoadditive Latent Variable Modelling of Child Morbidity. TR Munich University.

    Childs, C., Elliott, J., Khatab, K., Hampshaw, S., Fowler-Davis, S., Willmott, J.R., & Ali, A. (n.d.). Thermal Sensation in Older People, with and without Dementia, Living in Residential Care: New Assessment Approaches Using Infrared Thermography. . http://doi.org/10.20944/preprints202008.0337.v1

    Conference papers

    Khatab, K. (2018). Prevalence of child welfare in Egypt using Bayesian Geospatial Modelling. In Geospatial Child Health and Epidemiology Seminar, 20 June 2018.

    Khatab, K. (2018). Child health and epidemiology with Bayesian geo-additive latent variable models. GEO-STATISTICS.

    Masod, S., Gubmer, A., & Khatab, K. (2014). Pattern of Government and Household Health Care Financing in Pakistan. Early Career Researcher Conference.

    Khatab, K. (2013). Application of Bayesian geoadditive mixed latent variable model to the child's health problems. ISI World Statistics.

    IInthawong, R., Whitfield, M., Khatab, K., & Collins, K. (2012). Estimating the impact of reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors in Thailand. health challenge.

    IInthawong, R., Whitfield, M., Khatab, K., & Collins, K. (2012). Application of the cardiovascular disease risk assessment equation in the Thai population. health challenge Thailand.

    Khatab, K. (2012). Bayesian approach to the child's health problems. ISBA.

    Felten, M., & Khatab, K. (2012). Exposure with toxic substances among electronic-waste workers: Concept for multi-centre, multinational assessment study in Africa. International science of exposure assessments.

    Khatab, K., Felten, M., Kandala, N.-.B., Ghilagaber, G., & Kraus, T. (2011). Risk factors associated with asbestos-related lung diseases among different sub-cohorts of formerly asbestos exposed workers in Germany. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 68 (Suppl1). http://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100382.231

    Khatab, K., Felten, M., Kandala, N.-.B., Ghilagaber, G., & Kraus, T. (2011). Risk factors associated with asbestos-related lung diseases among different sub-cohorts of formerly asbestos exposed workers in Germany. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 68 (Suppl1). http://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100382.231

    Felten, M., Khatab, K., Knoll, L., Müller-Berndorff, H., & Kraus, T. (2011). Serial measurements of mesothelin and osteopontin in formerly asbestos exposed power industry workers. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 68 (Suppl1). http://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100382.230

    Khatab, K., & Felten, M. (2011). Serial measurements of mesothelin and osteopontin in for- merly asbestos exposed power industry workers. In Occupational Health, Occup Environ Med. BMJ

    Khatab, K., & Felten, M. (2011). Asbestos-related lung diseases among different sub-cohorts of formerly asbestos exposed workers in Germany. International on Epidemiology in Occup Health.

    Felten, M., Khatab, K., Knoll, L., Schettgen, T., & Berndorff, H. (2011). measurements of mesothelin and osteopontin in formerly asbestos exposed power industry workers. International Epidemiology in Occup Health.

    Khatab, K. (2010). Child health situation in Egypt. International Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences.

    Khatab, K., & Felten, M. (2010). Asbestos lung related diseases among different sub-cohorts of formally asbestos workers in Germany. International Occupational Hygiene Association.

    Khatab, K. (2010). Childhood Malnutrition in DRC. the International Society for Bayesian Analysis.

    Khatab, K. (2009). Advanced techniques in the modelling of child health problems. International Statistical Institutions.

    Khatab, K., & Fahrmeir, L. (2009). Analysis of Childhood Morbidity with Geoadditive Probit and Latent Variables. ICHO.

    Khatab, K. (2009). Deskriptive Analyse asbestbedingter Malig- nome ehemals exponierter Kraftwerksmitarbeiter. DGAUM.

    Khatab, K. (2008). Geoadditive Latent Variable Modelling of Child Morbidity and Malnutrition. Statistics and Life Sciences.

    Khatab, K. (2006). A Bayesian semi-parametric latent variable model for binary responses with application on Childhood disease in developing countries. Empirical Economics.

    Khatab, K., & Fahrmeir, L. (2006). Semi-parametric modelling of malnutrition status of children using geoadditive Gaussian regression and Latent models. Actual Biometrical Problems in public health.

    Khatab, K. (2006). Analysis of childhood disease in developing countries with geoadditive probit and latent variable models. child mortality in ASIA/AFRICA.

    Book chapters

    Khatab, K. (2012). Associations Between Nutritional Indicators Using Geoadditive Latent Variable Models with Application to Child Malnutrition in Nigeria. In Tropical Medicine. Tech

    Books

    Ngianga-Bakwin, K., & Gerbrenegus, G. (Eds.). (2013). Bayesian Geoadditive Mixed Latent Variable Models with Applications to Child Health Problems in Egypt and Nigeria. Springer.

    Khatab, K. (Ed.). (2011). Association between Measurements of the Malnutrition Status of Children in Nigeria using Geoadditive Latent Variable Models. Tech.

    Khatab, K. (Ed.). (2011). Association between Measurements of the Malnutrition Status of Children in Nigeria using Geoadditive Latent Variable Models. Tech.

    Khatab, K. (Ed.). (2011). Analysis of childhood diseases and malnutrition in developing countries of Africa. Dissertation, Department of Statistics.

    Khatab, K. (Ed.). (2011). Analysis of childhood diseases and malnutrition in developing countries of Africa. Dissertation, Department of Statistics.

    Reports

    Khatab, K., Breckon, J., & Gee, M. (2015). Physical Activity in People with Multiple Sclerosis and its Health Economics Impact. Multiple Sclerosis Society publication.

    Theses / Dissertations

    Thongchundee, O. (2019). Cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of dementia in Thailand. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Khatab, K., & Shibli, S. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00241

    Thongchundee, O. (2019). Cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of dementia in Thailand. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Khatab, K., & Shibli, S. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00241

    Thongchundee, O. (2019). Cost-effectiveness of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of dementia in Thailand. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Khatab, K., & Shibli, S. http://doi.org/10.7190/shu-thesis-00241

    Inthawong, R. (2015). Assessing the impact of reducing risk factors for cardio-vascular disease in Thailand. (Doctoral thesis). Supervised by Whitfield, M., & Khatab, K.

  • Other activities

    Editorships:

    Editor, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ( Since 2019)

    Academic Editor, PLOS ONE Journal (since 2017).

    Editorial Board, Biostatistics and Epidemiology journal (2018)

     Executive Editor in Chief, Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine (since 2011)

     Editorial Board, Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine (since 2011)

     Scientific Consultation Board, Royal Statistical Society, London (since 2010)

    Reviewer: 

    Rater for the NIHR Dissemination Centre (since 2015

     External Examiner - Aachen University, Munich University

     Reviewer, American Journal of Tropical and Hygiene

     Reviewer, Social Science & Medicine

     Reviewer, International Journal of equity and health

     Reviewer, Journal of Health and Place

     Reviewer, Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences

     Reviewer, National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

     Reviewer, The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)

     Reviewer, Medical Research Council (MRC)


  • Postgraduate supervision

    • Investigating the Associations between Childhood Mortality, Non-malaria and Malaria among Under-Five Children in Nigeria: A Multilevel Multinomial Modeling Approach ( Since September 2019, Jointly supervised with the University of Sheffield )
    • Cost-Effectiveness of Atypical Antipsychotics for the treatment of Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Thailand (completed 2019).
    • Assessing the impact of reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Thailand (completed, SHU, 2015).
    • Radiological surveillance of former asbestos-exposed power industry workers (completed, 2013)



    • Cost-Effectiveness of Atypical Antipsy-chotics for the treatment of Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Thailand (2018).
    • Assessing the impact of reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease in Thailand (completed, SHU, 2015).
    • Radiological surveillance of former asbestos exposed power industry workers (completed, 2013)

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