Skip to content

  1. About us
  2. Our people
  3. Staff profiles
  4. Dr Leighton Jones

Dr Leighton Jones PhD, MSc, CSci, FHEA, PGCert

Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Science (Exercise Psychology)


Summary

Leighton is a sport and exercise scientist with a specialism in exercise psychology. His research interests include exercise interventions, exercise motivation, and behaviour change.

He teaches across all levels of undergraduate study on the Sport and Exercise Science degree programme and the Physical Activity, Sport and Health degree programme.

About

Leighton joined the Academy of Sport and Physical Activity at Sheffield Hallam University in January 2015 having previously worked and studied at Brunel University London, Liverpool John Moores University, and Bishop Grosseteste University. 

Leighton is a sport and exercise scientist with a specialism in exercise psychology. His research interests include the psychological, psychophysiological, and neurophysiological effects of interventions during exercise. To date, his research has primarily focused on the application of music during exercise and this has extended into exploring the effects that multiple stimuli (music and video) can have during exercise. More broadly, he holds research interests in exercise motivation and behaviour change.

Leighton teaches across all levels of undergraduate study on the Sport and Exercise Science degree programme and the Physical Activity, Sport and Health degree programme. He delivers lectures, seminars, and workshops on modules including Foundations of Psychology in Sport and Exercise, Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology, Research Methods, Scientific Principles of Physical Activity, Sport and Health, and Work-based Learning in Sport and Exercise Science. He also supervises a number of undergraduate and postgraduate projects.

Teaching

Subject area

Sport and Exercise Science
Physical Activity
Sport and Health

Modules

Foundations of Psychology in Sport and Exercise
Psychology of Sport and Exercise
Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology
Scientific Principles in Physical Activity, Sport and Health
Research Methods in Physical Activity, Sport and Health
Contemporary Issues in Physical Activity, Sport, and Health
Work-based Learning

Publications

Journal articles

Rumbold, J., Madigan, D.J., Murtagh-Cox, A., & Jones, L. (2021). Examining Profiles of the Big Five and Sensation Seeking among Competitive Climbers. Psychology of Sport and Exercise. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2021.101951

Karageorghis, C.I., Jones, L., Howard, L.W., Thomas, R.M., Moulashis, P., & Santich, S.J. (2020). When It HIITs, You Feel No Pain: Psychological and Psychophysiological Effects of Respite-Active Music in High-Intensity Interval Training. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1-12. http://doi.org/10.1123/jsep.2019-0335

Jones, L., Stork, M.J., & Oliver, L.S. (2020). Affective responses to high-intensity interval training with continuous and respite music. Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-8. http://doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2020.1801324

Zenko, Z., Kahn, R., Berman, C., Hutchinson, J., & Jones, L. (2019). Do exercisers maximize their pleasure by default? Using prompts to enhance the affective experience of exercise. Sport, exercise, and performance psychology. http://doi.org/10.1037/spy0000183

Jones, L., & Ekkekakis, P. (2019). Affect and prefrontal hemodynamics during exercise under immersive audiovisual stimulation: improving the experience of exercise for overweight adults. Journal of Sport and Health Science, 8 (4), 325-338. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jshs.2019.03.003

Jones, L., Hutchinson, J.C., & Mullin, E.M. (2018). In the zone: an exploration of personal characteristics underlying affective responses to heavy exercise. Journal of sport and exercise psychology, 40 (5), 249-258. http://doi.org/10.1123/jsep.2017-0360

Hutchinson, J.C., Jones, L., Vitti, S.N., Moore, A., Dalton, P.C., & O'Neil, B.J. (2018). The influence of self-selected music on affect-regulated exercise intensity and remembered pleasure during treadmill running. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 7 (1), 80-92. http://doi.org/10.1037/spy0000115

Jones, L., Karageorghis, C.I., & Ekkekakis, P. (2017). Can High-Intensity Exercise Be More Pleasant? Attentional Dissociation Using Music and Video (vol 36, pg 528, 2014). JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 39 (3), 234. http://doi.org/10.1123/sep.2017-0208

Jones, L., Tiller, N., & Karageorghis, C.I. (2017). Psychophysiological effects of music on acute recovery from high-intensity interval training. Physiology & Behavior, 170, 106-114. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2016.12.017

Jones, L., Karageorghis, C.I., Lane, A.M., & Bishop, D.T. (2015). The Influence of Motivation and Attentional Style on Affective, Cognitive, and Behavioral Outcomes of an Exercise Class. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports, 27 (1), 124-135. http://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12577

Hutchinson, J.C., Karageorghis, C.I., & Jones, L. (2015). See Hear: psychological effects of music and music-video during treadmill running. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 49 (2), 199-211. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-014-9647-2

Jones, L., Karageorghis, C.I., & Ekkekakis, P. (2014). Can high-intensity exercise be more pleasant?: Attentional dissociation using music and video. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 36 (5), 528-541. http://doi.org/10.1123/jsep.2014-0251

Karageorghis, C.I., & Jones, L. (2014). On the stability and relevance of the exercise heart rate–music-tempo preference relationship. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 15 (3), 299-310. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.08.004

Karageorghis, C.I., Hutchinson, J.C., Jones, L., Farmer, H.L., Ayhan, M.S., Wilson, R.C., & Bailey, S.G. (2013). Psychological, psychophysical, and ergogenic effects of music in swimming. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 4 (4), 560-568. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychsport.2013.01.009

Karageorghis, C.I., Jones, L., Priest, D.L., Akers, R.I., Clarke, A., Perry, J., & Lim, H.B.T. (2011). Revisiting the relationship between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 82 (2), 274-284. http://doi.org/10.1080/02701367.2011.10599755

Karageorghis, C.I., Jones, L., & Stuart, D.P. (2008). Psychological Effects of Music Tempi during Exercise. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 29 (7), 613-619. http://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-989266

Karageorghis, C.I., Jones, L., & Low, D.C. (2006). Relationship Between Exercise Heart Rate and MusicTempo Preference. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 77 (2), 240-250. http://doi.org/10.1080/02701367.2006.10599357

Conference papers

Jones, L., Stork, M., & Oliver, L. (2018). Can HIIT be more pleasant? Examining the affective responses to different applications of music during HIIT. JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 40, S7.

Jones, L., Hutchinson, J., & Mullin, E. (2018). Exploring the role of trait characteristics underlying variable affective responses to exercise. JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 40, S98.

Jones, L., Cox, A., Zenko, Z., & Stork, M. (2018). Are you feeling good yet? Addressing the need for pleasure during continuous, interval, and resistance training protocols. JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 40, S6.

Zenko, Z., Kahn, R., Hutchinson, J., & Jones, L. (2018). Nudging beyond the default: Prompting exercisers to increase pleasure and enjoyment increases experienced and remembered pleasure and enjoyment. JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 40, S126.

Jones, L., Tiller, N.B., & Karageorghis, C.I. (2016). Psychological and psychophysiological effects of recuperative music in repetitive high-intensity exercise. JOURNAL OF SPORT & EXERCISE PSYCHOLOGY, 38, S38.

Share this page

Cancel event

Are you sure you want to cancel your place on Saturday 12 November?