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Sam Twiselton

Samantha Twiselton

Director of Sheffield Institute of Education

Summary

Professor Samantha Twiselton is the Director of Sheffield Institute of Education at Sheffield Hallam University - a national centre of education research and practice, recognised for its excellence and innovation in teaching and learning. In this role she uses her research and practice in the development of teacher expertise to develop a range of innovative workplace embedded approaches to Initial and Continuing Teacher development.

With experience in teacher education, curriculum development and language and literacy, Sam has been heavily involved in influencing Government policy on teacher education and was recently a member of the advisory panel for the Department for Education Carter Review of ITT in England and the DfE Expert Behaviour Management Panel chaired by Tom Bennett.

  • About

    Professor Samantha Twiselton is the Director of Sheffield Institute of Education at Sheffield Hallam University.

    The new Institute brings the University's broad teacher and related workforce education offer together with two research centres, the Centre for Science Education and the Centre for Education and Inclusion Research. As such its work is responsive to employer needs, flexibly developed and underpinned by a depth and breadth of outstanding, leading edge academic and practitioner expertise.

    Professor Twiselton was previously Executive Dean in the faculty of education at the University of Cumbria where she worked for six years. Prior to that she held a number of senior academic roles in teacher education at St Martin's College, having previously taught in a range of primary schools.

    With a wealth of experience in teacher education, curriculum development and language and literacy, Professor Twiselton has been heavily involved in influencing Government policy on teacher training, such as the introduction of masters level Initial Teacher Education and ways in which universities can support and embrace the move to a school-led system.

    Sam was recently a member of the advisory panel for the Carter Review of ITT and was heavily involved in visiting providers, meeting with experts and analyzing a wide range of evidence from across all routes and the DfE Expert Behaviour Management Panel chaired by Tom Bennett. She sits on a number of national and regional advisory boards and committees.

    Specialist areas of interest

    Teacher development, literacy, enquiry based learning

  • Teaching

    Education

  • Research

    DfE Evaluation of Evidence Based Teaching

  • Publications

    Elton-Chalcraft, S, Hansen, A and Twiselton s (2008) (eds) Doing Classroom Research

    Twiselton, S (2010) 'Developing your Teaching Skills' in Learning to Teach in the Primary School, Arthur, A, Grainger, T. (eds) Routledge

    Cooper (ed) (2011)Professional Studies in the Primary School, Sage

    Twiselton, S (2016) 'Different Approaches to Teacher Education: Maximising Expertise and Re-Examining the Role of Universities and Schools,' in Building Bridge; Rethinking Literacy Teacher Education in a Digital Era Kosnik, C, White, S, Beck, C, Marshall, B, Goodwin, L and Murray, J., Sense Publishers

    Twiselton, S. (2003), ‘Beyond the Curriculum: Learning to Teach Primary Literacy’ in Interactions in language and literacy in the classroom’ (eds) Bearne, E.. Dombey, H. and Grainger, T. , OUP

    Twiselton, S. (2004)The Role of Teacher Identity in Learning to Teach primary Literacy in Education Section Review: Special Edition: Activity Theory

    Twiselton, S (2005) 'Developing your Teaching Skills' in Learning to Teach in the Primary School, Arthur, A, Grainger, T. and Wray, D. (eds) Routledge

    Twiselton, S (2006) The problem with English: the exploration and development of student teachers’ English subject knowledge in primary classrooms, Literacy Journal

    Twiselton, S (2007) Seeing the wood for the trees: learning to teach beyond the curriculum. How can student teachers be helped to see beyond the National Literacy Strategy? Cambridge Journal of Education Vol. 37, No. 4, pp. 489–502

  • Other activities

    External Examiner Edinburgh University

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