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National conversation launched to help people with health conditions to become more active

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26 May 2021

National conversation launched to help people with health conditions to become more active

A national conversation around making it easier for people with long-term health conditions to be more physically active has been launched by the National Centre for Sport & Exercise Medicine (NCSEM) in collaboration with Sheffield Hallam University and Sport England

Press contact: Nicky Swire | nicky.swire@shu.ac.uk

Older people taking part in an exercise class with resistance bands.
Easier to be Active conversation launched

The project team is seeking individuals from across the country to share their views, insights and experiences of living with long-term health conditions, to understand more about how access sport and physical activity opportunities can be improved. The online conversation is open until Monday 31 May.

This latest phase of the #EasierToBeActive project aims to find out how different parts of the sport, physical activity and health systems can make it easier for someone with a health condition to be more active. 

It follows the online conversation held last year, which saw 350 people contribute more than 1,000 ideas, comments and votes to help inform a set of principles that, if put into practice, would make it easier to be active with a health condition.

Physical inactivity remains one of the top ten causes of disease and disability in England and is responsible for one-in-six deaths in the UK – the same number as smoking. A third of adults live with a long-term health condition and are twice as likely to be inactive.

A long-term condition is classed as an illness that cannot be cured but can usually be controlled with medicines or other treatments. Examples include arthritis, asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, angina, heart failure and high blood pressure (hypertension).

The project is being delivered through a partnership between Sheffield Hallam’s Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre (AWRC) and National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine (NCSEM) and Sport England, Public Health England and Clever Together.

Dr Anna Lowe, programme manager for the NCSEM Sheffield, said: “Being active is an important way of preventing and managing many long-term health conditions.  Research suggests that people with health conditions are less likely to be active than those without health conditions and are therefore missing out on all the benefits that movement can bring.  We want to make it easier for people with health conditions to be active. We know that many people have a role in influencing the situation, and that people closest to this issue will have the most relevant insights. That’s why we have taken the approach of having a ‘national conversation’ and we want to hear from everyone connected to this issue. It’s a really important opportunity to have your say and to contribute to positive change.”

Sheffield Hallam University’s £14m Advanced Wellbeing Research Centre is dedicated to improving the health and wellbeing of the population through innovations that help people move.

To take part in the conversation, please visit the #EasierToBeActive website: https://easiertobeactive.clevertogether.com/welcome-and-register 

 

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Nicky Swire

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Phone: 01142 252811

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